Skip to main content

Full text of "WBAI folio"

See other formats


WBAI 

Folio 



from the 

Pacifica Radio Archives 



This cover sheet created by Internet Archive for formatting. 




:--\ f>^ -*'• 




,^.>Srrr 







ol 

-J I 

o 



•TliffiTtli 



i 



oo O 







rr:w 



TTSK^ 







^ 


... ..-siS 


5»- 


mm 



w^ 



'I. 






THE CARLIN CASE 



What started out as a small moment 
on Paul Gorman's free-form program, 
Lunchpail, is now a Supreme Court 
case. The airing of comedian George 
Carlin's monologue, 'The Seven Words 
You Can't Say on Television", landed 
WBAI in court with the Federal Com- 
munications Commission. This resulted 
last spring in a decision by U.S. Court 
of Appeals which overruled the FCC — 
declaring its anti-indecency guidelines 
unclear and its action against WBAI an 
improper use of censorship. 

Initially, Pacifica was alone in de- 
fending the right to broadcast the seven 
words (which, by the way, are "fuck," 
"shit," "piss, " "mother-fucker," "cock- 
sucker," "cunt," and "tit"); the broad- 
cast establishment was wary of joining 
a struggle against the FCC. We received 
no support ; in fact, we were told we'd 
lose. Yet we won a victory in a battle 
that almost no one knew was going on. 
Now that the Supreme Court has taken 
on the case, it's receiving national 
coverage (TV Guide, with a circulation 
of 68 million, recently ran an article) — 
and the broadcast establishment is 
finally realizing that their interests are 
also at stake (NBC and the National 
Association of Broadcasters have both 
expressed interest in filing amicus 
briefs). 

The issue here is not a question of 
dirty words, but of the power of a 
federal agency to determine what 
people can or cannot hear over the 
public airwaves. This question has 
already been answered in the realms of 
print and film; language that is com- 
mon to the people is already common 



by Joe Cuomo 

in contemporary films and books (so 
much so that the controversy surround- 
ing Norman Mailer's suggestive use of 
the word "fugg " in The Naked and the 
Dead seems almost laughable today). 
But radio and TV are still constricted 
by the standards that were antiquated 
for non-broadcast media in the sixties. 

Pacifica has consistently acted re- 
sponsibly, creatively, and aggressively, 
with regard to broadcast freedoms. 
Some time ago, after WBAI broadcast 
live phone calls from inmates in New 
York City jails, the station refused to 
hand over tapes of those calls when 
they were subpoenaed by the Man- 
hattan District Attorney. (The tapes 
were to be >ised to prosecute prisoners 
through voice print identifications). 
The then Station Manager at 'BAl, Ed 
Goodman, went to jail over the issue. 

With regard to the Carlin Case, there 
is a crucial and expensive struggle 
ahead (listeners should note, however, 
that monies regularly donated to the 
Station are not used toward our court 
expenses: sometime in April or May, 
Carlin himself will be doing a benefit to 
help defray these expenses) . As it comes 
before the nation's Supreme Court, the 
case of the FCC v. WBAI-Pacifica 
could finally (and for some time to 
come, irreversibly) decide whether or 
not the government has the right to 
determine what broadcasters can or 
cannot say. 





Lisa Ryan 



GEORGE PLIMPTON: 
Excerpt from an Interview 



George Plimpton, author of Shadow Box, is interviewed by Bill Kortum, Satur- 
day, March 4 at 11:00 P.M. 
March folio 



George Plimpton is a founder of The Paris Review and co-editor of The Paris 
Review Interviews: Writers at Work (Viking/Penguin). He's written many books 
on sports — perhaps his best known being Paper Lion (Harper & Row/Signet), 
which was about his stint as a participatory journalist with the Detroit Lions. He's 
also a special contributor to Sports Illustrated and an associate editor of Harper's 
Magazine. 

What follows is an excerpt from an interview I recently did with him. We 
talked mostly about his latest book. Shadow Box (G.P. Putnam's). 

Bill Kortum 

BK : How do you feel about boxing? 

GP: Boxing was something that I went to— when 1 began doing it as a journalist 
— with preconceptions that I wouldn't really enjoy doing it. And, indeed, the 
pleasure has been in studying the other people who do it. Doing it oneself does not 
give me any pleasure whatsoever. I'm not a man who likes to be hit on the nose. 
And I've never really liked to try to hit other people on the nose. 
BK: I read an interview that you did a number of years ago, where you talked 
about dramatic confrontations and the essential nature of sport. 
GP: Well, 1 think the thing about boxing is that it is the most dramatic of the 
confrontations — the simplest, the most primal, the most ancient — one man versus 
another. Modern sports is so cluttered up with teams and the mechanics of a huge 
warfare going on that sometimes one forgets — the confrontation is submerged in 
the mass of people and in the difficulty of understanding the game. Yet, some- 
how, to get back to a simple struggle between two people in a ring — governed as 
they are by rules — is the most dramatic confrontation of them all, which is why 
the attention of the world is riveted when you have the heavyweight champion- 
ship fight. Contmuedonpagee. 

page 3 




in 
a 
u 
> 

O 
D 
< 

oa 

UJ 

X 
H 



2 c 

O > 



o ° 



n> C £2 



00 



c .a 

60 C 
a; C 

C N 
4, ^ 

('I r« 
4» ™ 

</) 

jT 

!•- 

t/i 



U 



"D (9 ■" 



(A 
.2 73 

3 CO 
^ - 

w ID 
■ (N 

N 1-1 
01 
> C 



Ol 



*9 Q. 

c^ ■ 

i !S I" 

s (u 5 
■s ^ '^ 

C O r- 

2 J -5 
c -ti c 

.i§l 

J= §•<!> 
in -' r- 

c P 2 

fB 



« (/I 



CQ 



C &. 



00 " 
Ol 

00.5 fl 
o E^ 



Ol 

o; 

C 






01 
3 

1 3 



3 O _4J 

.2 " iS 
00-^ ^ 

O) (9 •** 

^ E i> 

t; "c -3 






> (0 

> 4, - 



U (/J 

01 OJ 

O 






o c 



OJ 

I -o 

i 

•c 

B 
< 



^ 2H K 

. o .S K 
-I- ? ^^ 

° S "i 
i« ™ o 

-p 0) 

:5f E 

O) " 0( 

-c '^ 

01 x: •> 

^^ o c 

0; Ol a; 

D.;3 ■£ 






^ 01 

^ S .- ^ 

HI 
•" S ^ « 



.M -T-] u O' 

-a 3 "^ •" 

^ S SbS 

." 01 t: '^ 

£ C/5 0* I' 

u • -i u 
01 £ ii 

'oT S "C 2 



(9 
0) 



i ^ 



■5 c 



(9 b S "> 

S o t T 



■a -a >> 
o; c = 

C 3 (0 

E o 

C (9 ii 

o -c _ 

OJ >• C 

E 



— - u u. 



£i E 
a; 

-a 

01 



c^ ^- '-' i3 



N 

> 

Ol 

> 

.a 

"oJ 



Ol 



oj "T! 
(/I *-< 

o 15 
u 

Ol 



^ii 



Ol 



(9 

u 

2 « 
.id ^ 

C .-S o* 2 



■C 60 



3 O 

e •-' 

E " ° 

c . o 

nj >^ Ol o 



T3 (9 

^ « Ul 

r9 o> .t-* 

"K u 3 

01 

^ -a i2 



(9 



01 



I (9 <^ 



^ O Xl 5 

E a.-c 2. 

.3 u ^ 

^ C 01 ID 

•i 19 T3 (9 



— — *** V) 

j= ■" > ■£ 

j-< (/I *^ 

(/I Ui u 

m .-ii (9 *.• 

_ Ol o; S 

u- „, C i2 

i: ■£ <! o 



01 o; 



a, .s 

•£ 19 

o E 

(9 
O -D 



E c 

- (9 



o > 



c ■ 



C o; 

(9 2 

'-t: <9 
°2 

— c 

01 <9 
-C - 
." (9 

-^ c 

01 

CQ 



y Ol 
"■ <9 



^ 5 
- c o 

I 'r.* ( 

n> — . 

o; 
'^ 01 



19 i; 

E •- 



0/ O 






00 


01 


c 


N 






E 


> 


n 


i" 


u< 




a 




k 
o 


U 

J9 


u 


(9 


c 


-C 


3 


u 



.£ I 

(/I (9 

c^ is 

E:3 
00 )< 

01 

2 o 

oj 't: 

TJ (9 

u 

-a 00 

(9 c 



0< 
O; — 

I ^ S 

QJ U (XI 

"" E -" 

01 01 p 

3£ C 



^^ S in 

JS 01 

(9 O l" 

S .2 •- 

00 S"^ 

■So S 

u. *.» in 

to (9 in 

in t ■-J- 

^ (9 O 

-S S &^; 

C > *i 

o - c 

^ (9 01 

2 g E 

-c ^ E 

nj • O 

s^ ^ 

E o "^ 

'o o S 

1—1 ^ . 



I a> 



in 



"3 o i 



D..Ji 
O > 

^2 

^:e 

o " 

in 0< 



% ^ 






<9 

(9 
O 



I _C 01 in Ui 



.- 01 

o; X 

Z 2 

o< C 
y o 

UJ <u 

•C <" 

Ol (U 

2H 



in Ui 

„ o • - 

II 5 

^^^ 5 c 



01 



H 



c 
o 



P o 

3 O 

E « 

.3 i-H 



u O 

(9 >, 

u Z 

33 O 

S 2 

'C 00 

Ol -3 

« E 

o; C 

X .3 

01 
-T3 ^ 

C u. 

<u ^^ 

01 o 
JZ OJ 

*- u 

.»- c 

(9 Ol 



JiT3 "^ 
C ^ O) 

S S 3 

E ^ c 

*^ ^*i .3 

oj -a " 

t! S ** 
"« " g 

U (A O 

1-5 c "^^ 

in <9 O 
"(9 3'" 

01 -a c 
o g.x 

« Ie 
^85 



73 

C 

in .a 

JS 
01 
CO 



cu 
o 
o 



o 
o 



tn 

H 
X 

u 

z 

< 

D 

z 

o 



Jessica Raimi 







THE CARLIN CASE 



What started out as a small moment 
on Paul Gorman's free-form program, 
Lunchpail, is now a Supreme Court 
case. The airing of comedian George 
Carlin's monologue, 'The Seven Words 
You Can't Say on Television", landed 
WBAI in court with the Federal Com- 
munications Commission. This resulted 
last spring in a decision by U.S. Court 
of Appeals which overruled the FCC — 
declaring its anti-indecency guidelines 
unclear and its action against WBAI an 
improper use of censorship. 

Initially, Pacifica was alone in de- 
fendir\g the right to broadcast the seven 
words (which, by the way, are "fuck," 
"shit," "piss, " "mother-fucker," ""cock- 
sucker,"" ""cunt,"" and "'tit"); the broad- 
cast establishment was wary of joining 
a struggle against the FCC. We received 
no support ; in fact, we were told we'd 
lose. Yet we won a victory in a battle 
that almost no one knew was going on. 
Now that the Supreme Court has taken 
on the case, it's receiving national 
coverage (TV Guide, with a circulation 
of 68 million, recently ran an article) — 
and the broadcast establishment is 
finally realizing that their interests are 
also at stake (NBC and the National 
Association of Broadcasters have both 
expressed interest in filing amicus 
briefs). 

The issue here is not a question of 
dirty words, but of the power of a 
federal agency to determine what 
people can or cannot hear over the 
public airwaves. This question has 
already been answered in the realms of 
print and film; language that is com- 
mon to the people is already common 



by Joe Cuomo 

in contemporary films and books (so 
much so that the controversy surround- 
ing Norman Mailer's suggestive use of 
the word "fugg" in The Naked and the 
Dead seems almost laughable today). 
But radio and TV are still constricted 
by the standards that were antiquated 
for non-broadcast media in the sixties. 

Pacifica has consistently acted re- 
sponsibly, creatively, and aggressively, 
with regard to broadcast freedoms. 
Some time ago, after WBAI broadcast 
live phone calls from inmates in New 
York City jails, the station refused to 
hand over tapes of those calls when 
they were subpoenaed by the Man- 
hattan District Attorney. (The tapes 
were to be >ised to prosecute prisoners 
through voice print identifications). 
The then Station Manager at 'BAl, Ed 
Goodman, went to jail over the issue. 

With regard to the Carlin Case, there 
is a crucial and expensive struggle 
ahead (listeners should note, however, 
that monies regularly donated to the 
Station are not used toward our court 
expenses; sometime in April or May, 
Carlin himself will be doing a benefit to 
help defray these expenses) . As it comes 
before the nation's Supreme Court, the 
case of the FCC v. WBAI-Pacifica 
could finally (and for some time to 
come, irreversibly) decide whether or 
not the government has the right to 
determine what broadcasters can or 
cannot say. 





Lisa Ryan 



GEORGE PLIMPTON: 
Excerpt from an Interview 



George Plimpton, author of Shadow Box, is interviewed by Bill Kortum, Satur- 
day, March 4 at 11 : 00 P.M. 
March Folio 



George Plimpton is a founder of The Paris Review and co-editor of The Paris 
Review Interviews: Writers at Work (Viking/Penguin). He's written many books 
on sports — perhaps his best known being Paper Lion (Harper & Row/Signet), 
which was about his stint as a participatory journalist with the Detroit Lions. He's 
also a special contributor to Sporfs Illustrated and an associate editor of Harper's 
Magazine. 

What follows is an excerpt from an interview I recently did with him. We 
talked mostly about his latest book. Shadow Box (G.P. Putnam's). 

Bill Kortum 

BK: How do you feel about boxing? 

GP: Boxing was something that 1 went to— when 1 began doing it as a journalist 
— with preconceptions that 1 wouldn't really enjoy doing it. And, indeed, the 
pleasure has been in studying the other people who do it . Doing it oneself does not 
give me any pleasure whatsoever. I'm not a man who likes to be hit on the nose. 
And I've never really liked to try to hit other people on the nose. 
BK: I read an interview that you did a number of years ago, where you talked 
about dramatic confrontations and the essential nature of sport. 
GP: Well, I think the thing about boxing is that it is the most dramatic of the 
confrontations — the simplest, the most primal, the most ancient — one man versus 
another. Modern sports is so cluttered up with teams and the mechanics of a huge 
warfare going on that sometimes one forgets — the confrontation is submerged in 
the mass of people and in the difficulty of understanding the game. Yet, some- 
how, to get back to a simple struggle between two people in a ring — governed as 
they are by rules — is the most dramatic confrontation of them all, which is why 
the attention of the world is riveted when you have the heavyweight champion- 
ship fight . Contmued on page 6. 

pages 




ADMIMSTRATHX 

Anna Kosof (gcncnl nuugerl. Man Hoostoo (bnsiiKss manager). Bill Komm (svrtcfaboard operator), 
Ira Lcibtn (subscriptions). Ric)c Harris (program coordinator). Richartl Barr (director of communrty 
outreach) 

NEWS AND PUBUC AFFAIKS 

Abraham Aig (weekeikd nevs director). Marty Goldeosoho (news director). Cdeste Wesson (public 
afTain director). E>iajK Behar. Bruce Brown, Marjorie Finkelstein. Gregory Firaga. John Fisk, Jerry 
Hatch, Paul Hocffd. Jon Kalish. P e i e t^ Kidron (Jenisaiem). Amie KJein. Nitu Meode, Dat-id Metzger. 
Marcos -Miranda, Judith Murray. Pat Peppi (Rome). Joe Pissarevsky. Erica Schwartz, Ruth Sbereff, 
Dan Sheridan (Chicago). Daniel Singer (Paris). Ytohik Turner. Bob Zalisk, Eileen Zalisk 

ENGINEEIUNG 

John Schmidt (acting chief engineer). Bill O'Neill (operations director), Darid Marx, Darid Rapkin. 
Larry Chan, Miles Smith, Paul Wuoder, Manoli Wetherell, Manya La Bmja, Robbie Barish, Ellis 
Villanurra 

MLSIC 

Paul Aaron. Bob Alexander. Richard Barr. Mickey Bass, Barbara Bemstein, Peter Bocfaan, Jim Barton, 
Georgia Cbrtstgau, Ted Cohen, Carlos De Leon, Bill Farrar, Ondina Fiore, Sara Fishko. Gary Giddins, 
V'ema Gillis, Edward Haber (interim music coordinator). Bill Hellerman. Ed Houser. Bill Howie. James 
Irsay. lJo>d James. Howard Johnson. Kathy Kaplan. Jamie Katz, Fred Kleinke, Manya La Bmja, 
Leonard Lopate, Frank Mare, Marian McPartland, Ilhan Mimart>glu, Ray Minard, Charles Mitchell, 
Bill Moore, Mildred Norman, Rodger Parsons, L Kofi Pendergrass, Alexa Penzner, Tom Piazza, Tom 
Pomposello, Jude Quintiere, Gregory Reere, Oayton Riley, Max Salazar. Mike Sappol. Laura Scolnick, 
Judv Sherman, "Six." Beaumont Small, Martin Sokol, Richard Sudhalter, Allen Taylor, ran Theobald. 
Roger TriUtng. Preston Trombly. Billy Vera, Don Wade, Mickey Wsldman, Chris Whent. Paul Wunder 

ANNOfNCERS/UVE RADIO 

LiiMl&ay Ardwin (chief announcer), Jon Freood (acting chief ajmoancer), Mike Sappol (Ihre radio de- 
partment head). Linda Perry. Robert Knight. Ira Leibin, Stacyasn Pober. Jessica Raiim. Paul Wunder. 
Oayton Riley, Sara Fbhko, Steve Post. Paul Gormac, Pepsi Charles, Judie Pastenuk, Paul Mclsaac 
Mickey Waldman. Ellis Haizlip. Leonard Lopate. Suyorican Poet's CaS:. Vema Gillis, Frank Heller, 
Andy Bleiberg, Mike Teitl^baom, Nick Petron. Bill Watson, Joe Frank, David Levine, Margot Adler (on 
kave), Beaumont Small. Joan Heney. John Fisk. Edward Haber, Vir Sutherlaod, Peter Bochan, Robbie 
Barish. BLI Young. Ken Davis, Lynn Samuels, Bill Lynch 

DRAMA, UTERATLTIE AND ART 

Liza Bear. Wesley Brown, Steve Cannon, Joe Cuomo (interim DAL director), Marjorie DeFazio, Ondiiu 
Fiorc, Francisco Fogle, Joe Frank. Judith Ghinger. Lin Harris. Rick Harris. Susan Howe. Judith ICac^ 
Al Kobryn. Bill Kortum. Barbara Loodm. Linda Perry. Marie Ponsot. Charles Potter. Mike Sappol, 
Shelly Sinderbrand, Hany Smith, James Umland, Paul Wuixler, Bob 7ji1kir Eileen Zalisk 

URBAN AFFAIRS 

Elaine Baly (director), Jacqni Asbell. John Dudley. Gregory Firaga, Lloyd James. Sandra Maninez. 
Terri O'Neal. U Kofi Pendergrass, Annette Walker (Caribbean editor), L James Wilson 

WOMEN'S DEPARTMENT 

Carmen Garcia, Jerry Hatch, Jodie Pasternak, Vir SotberUnd, Stacyaon Pober. Rebecr-a Tron, Eileen 
Zaiisk, Laura Aldricfa, Doooa Allegra. Jessica FaktEbi. Diane Torr, Rosemarie Reed, Rose Jordan, 
Amina Manoz 

GAY .MEN'S PROGRAMMING 

Greg Gazis. Frank Richter. David Wvnyard 

OTHER PRODUCERS AN'D VOLUNTEERS 

Gale CereL Alexa Penzner. Joy Rothman, Dr. Mark Chartrand. Phil Smith, Marc Raskin, denton/Thor, 
L)-nn Samuels. Martha Katz, Larry Cox, Terry Omstein, Larry Chan, Richard Barr. Bill Greene. Liz 
Christy. Marion Weinstein. Paul Rosenfiekl. Fred Kleinke. J Matisse Enzer 

PACfflCA NATIONAL BOARD 

R Gordon Agnew. Isabel Alegria. Robert Barron. Carol A. Bresheais. Ralph Engelman. Peter Franck, 
Margaret Glaser. Oscar Hanigsberg. Kenneth V. Jenkins. David Lampel. Thelma Meitzer. Jack O'Dell. 
Jonas Rosefield, Jr., William SokoL Peter Tagger, Tr»cy A. Westen. Joel Kugelmass (eiecutiire director) 

WSAI LOCAL BOARD 

Vemoe Andrews, Richard Ascbe. Ted Conant. Ralph Engelmao (chairman). Renee Fanner, Oscar 
Hanigsberg, Ken Jenkins, David Lampel, Milton A. Zisman 

PACmCA NAnONAL OFFICE 

Joel Kugelmass (executive director), Debra Kaufinan (administrative assistant). Ira Slobodien (data 
processing director) 

FOUO 

Jessica Raimi (editor), Andrea Torrice (advertising manager), Doug Frost, Carl Zeichner. Contributors 
to this issue: Joe Cuomo. Michael Griffin. Bill Kortum. Dan O'Mcara. Lisa Ryan, April VoUincr, Larry 
Weil. Carl Zeichner 




WBAI is on the air 24 hours a day. broadcasting at a bequency of 99.5 MHz. Our transmitter b located 
in the Empire Sute Building, and we broadcast with an ef T eJ tiv e radiated power of 5.4 kw (horizontaO 
and 3.&5 kw (vertical). Power equivalent to 50 kw at 500 feet. Our antenna staixis 1223 feet above 
average terrain. The studios are located at 359 East 62 Street. New York, N.Y. 10021. Subscriptions and 
donations may oe sent to WBAI. P.O. Box 12345, Church Street Station. New York, NY. 10249. 
Business inquiries may be made by calling during working hours at (212) 825-0400. Our usual on-the-air 
number b (212) 371-5200. WBAI b owned and operated by the Pacifica Foundation, a non-profit 
corporation operating four other stations in Washington. D.C.. Los Angeles, Berkeley and Houston. 

Production costs for the Folio are made possible, in part, through a grant fiom the Corporation for 
t>ublic Broadcasting 

page 4 




Pacifica will soon celebrate its thirtieth birthoay. We have outlived LIFE, LOOK. RAM- 
PARTS, Nixon, the Vietnam War. and financial crisis. Some say the most political thing 
we can do is to survive. But we have done more than that. We have had children — WPFW, 
our Washington station, is a year old, and KPFT in Houston has survived two bombings. 
And WBAI is the force behind the Carlin case. 

What is the Carlin Case? It's a long story, but 111 try to make it short. Paul Gorman, oui 
well-known and always adventurous producer, broadcast a recorded monologue by 
comedian George Carlin entitled 'The Seven Worlds You Can't Say on Television," on 
October 30, 1973. A listener found it offensive and complained to the Federal Coinmimica- 
tions Cominission. The Coinmission ruled against the stabon and Pacifica took the case to 
the courts. In the Appellate Division we won. They ruled that those words, at least when 
used in a context having social relevance, were permissible on the air. The Commission 
appealed this decision to the Supreme Court, which agreed to hear the case during its 
current term. 

What does all tliis mean? The Supreme Court's decision will have immeitse significance 
not orJy for Pacifica, but for all of broadcasting. The decision will establish not only what 
may be broadcast on the airwaves, but will also set a precedent concerning the powers of 
the FCC. 

This stniggle has been a long and cosdy one. We owe our lawyers a great deal of moitey 
for defending us in this case. But we are proud to have challenged existing standards. 
That's what Pacifica has been known for, for almost thirty years. 

Sincerely, 



We welcome letters to the editor on 
any subject of interest to the subscrib- 
ers of WBAI. Please adciress letters to 
Folio Editor, WBAI, 359 East 62 Street, 
New York, New York 10021. Please in- 
clude your name, address and phone 
number. 






HE 




Complaint 



Thanks, but. 



It was mentioned in a recent marathon 
that WBAI has "something to offend every- 
one.' On Jan. 22 as part of the Audio Ex- 
perimental Theater Day I heard part of a 
reading that has forced me to question the 
fundamental validity of the station. I am of- 
fended not as an individual of a particular 
socio-economic strata, but as a human be- 
ing. The man reading was describing his 
part in a violent encoimter where, to para- 
phrase, he and several other men forcibly 
took a woman, cut off her arms with a meat 
grinder and raped her. Accompanying this 
were "poetic statements" such as "and she 
wasn't even a good fuck. " I didn't listen 
long enough to find out whether it was fic- 
tion or fact but that is just about as irrel- 
evant as asking is it art? It isn't enough to 
preface shows as such with a warning that I 
might find the language offensive. Lan- 
guage is inert. 

For years WBAI has served to amplify 
the collective consciousness of its listeners 
but the process has reversed. The attain- 
ment of any extreme position is the point 
where it begins to turn into its opposite. 
C.G. Jimg called this process "erumtiodro- 
mia. " Perhaps WBAI should change its call 
ktterstoWCIA. 

James Ricd 



Yes 

Congratulations to one of the best Folios 
BAI has had. I inean the January Folio. It 
has a wealth of information and the many 
extras in art and artides make it very 
special. 

Did you know that the powerful photo- 
graph by Roman Vishniac appears in The 
Family of Man (the photographic exhibit 
[organized by] Edward Steichen). on page 
49. 

Mariaiuie E. Perten 



I know the critical condition you are in. I 

like your station so I'm trying to help. I 
don't have enough mone>' to subscribe be- 
cause my allowance is only 50c a week so I 
am trying to help in another way. I think 
you d get more customers if you had com- 
mercials. Almost e%'er\' chaime] on the 
radio has commercials so they re booming 
with business. "You see the fact is you are 
almost unknown except for the people who 
listen to you which certainly fe too few. 

Adam 
Your loyal listener 
P.S. My parents subscribe to you. 



Don't you think Roger 
is Trilling? 



Here I was ready to start preparing for our 
dinner — I began turning the radio dial and 
suddenly heard some great sound — 

I stopped and had to continue listening — 
can you imagine a sixty-six year old — five 
foot one— 118-pound woman dancing 
around her kitchen to the sound and great 
rhythm of "One Step Forward" — (which is 
what the young man called Roger Trilling 
said it was later on. I just had to call him 
and tell him how good it fell to hear that 
type of concordance of sound. ) 

I loved it! And now you have a fan of 
WBAI 

Sylvia Shuhnan 



Dear Editress: 



Thank you for the fine Folio which we are 
now receiving on time. Why a full page ad 
for womperson wri tresses? 

G. C. Michaels 



Cover by Michael Griffin. Copyright 1978 

Masthead and titles by April Vollmer. 

Typesetting by Myma Zimmerman. US ISSN 9942-9554 



Continued on page 1 7. 



March Folio 



W ''?7^ 



5:00 EARTH WATCH ~ 

Live radio with Robert Knight. 

7:00 RADIO aTY 

Live radio with Sara Fishko. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MORNING MUSIC 

Presented by Jim Theobald, vifho practices 

what he preaches. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

SOUND ART 

"Art. as it is expressed and experienced in 
sound, is the content of this hour. Ten art- 
ists with national or international reputa- 
tions will share the enormous space which. 
WBAl's frequency-modulated signal will 
provide." Produced by James Umland. 



4:00 COMMUNITY MEETING 
OF THE AIR 

Public housing— the effects of high-rise 
versus low-rise density. With members of 
the City University Environmental Psy- 
chology Center. Hosted by Richard Barr. 
(This program made possible in part by a 
grant from the N.Y. State Council on the 
Arts.) 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:15 SPECTRUM: CONVERSATIONS 
ABOUT AUDIO 

A question-and-answer program devoted to 
listeners' calls about any area of audio. 
Hosted by Rodger Parsons. 

8 : 00 AN INTERVIEW WITH 
TOM MAROTTA 

Tom Marotta is a photograoher and author 
of For They Are My Friends. He is current- 
ly working on a book of interviews with 
photographers. Produced by Joe Cuomo. 



1^ 



: M:.'^ 

• I 

. . . I 

Til 



(■^ W (5) (^ (3i {7) (/)<^ 

•4.^4. 4 ^^ -l 4- i 
i 7. > -5" f J 2. / 








/o. 


,*? 




' 




, i 


1o 


^ 




10 


i<7 


: I 


_, 1 






75: 


i^; 


i 


; 1 


[ 1 , 




r- 

1 


_..^ 


-- j- 


4- - 





5 

5 
5 

s . 



4 



3 
3 



z 



■f- (7) ■ i" 

I 



Sound piece (or solo voice, 1978, by James Umland. 



1:00 THE PUERTO RIC AN 
NATIONALIST PRISONERS 
On March 1, 1954, four Puerto Rican na- 
tionalists attacked the United States Con- 
gress to call attention to demands for Puerto 
Rican independence. Three of them are still 
in prison. Rafael Cancel Miranda, one of 
those who took part in the attack, and 
Zoraida Collazo, daughter of a Puerto 
Rican nationalist imprisoned after a similar 
incident in 1950, talk about this nationalist 
movement, and about being political pris- 
oners in the United States. Produced by 
Celeste Wesson. (Rebroadcast.) 

1:30 THE GOOD CITY 
UNDERGROUND ROCK SHOW 

Punk and new-wave music, presented by 
Bob Alexander. 

3 : 00 BREAD AND ROSES 

The Madness Network with Project Release. 
Members of the upper west side commu- 
nity, legislators and a representative from 
the Department of Mental Health take on 
the issue of the dumping of mental patients. 

Morch Folio 



9:00 THE CONCERNED PHOTOG- 
RAPHER-CORNELL CAPA 

Barbara Londin talks to Cornell Capa 
about the basic concepts of photog- 
raphy, its history, the excitement of 
the "immediate future," the meaning of 
"concerned photography" and the es- 
tablishment of the International Center 
of Photography 



10:00 BIX AND BEYOND 

Jazz with Dick Sudhalter. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LIVE FROM THE NUYORICAN 
POETS CAFE 

Live music, drama, interviews, poetry. 



HMUM 



aFaaiiE 



"Don't you think Bob Pass should be back on BA17" The program host may be trying to 
conduct a discussion on existentialism, Oklahoma, or the personals column of the Hew 
York Review of Books-an practically anything except— Bob Pass- when there's a caller 
with the above question. And Bob Pass, of course, isn't the only reason for those who feel 
the afflatus to steer discussion In their directions: someone might call seeking advice on 
whether he should continue to date Sharon Tate, or another caller might want to let us 
know there's a good movie playing on channel seven. 

What better way to stop such verbal incontinence than to hang up. Ah, but the host who 
does this will, within minutes, be accused of being proto-fascist — or worse, hell hear that 
the movie is starring Jan and Dean. And, "Who are you to put down Jan and Dean? They're 
the source of rock — bigger than the Beatles or Presley, that bum " If the caller really wants 
to give the impression he's thought about the "big picture," the host will get the "but-every- 
one-wants-to-discuss-Pass-and-this-is-free-radio " argument, or maybe there'll be an appeal 
on free speech grounds. The trouble with these two arguments, however, is that the people 
who espouse them spend entirely too little time thinking. 

Even if free speech is at issue here, an appeal to it certainly won't provide justification 
lor the impertinent caller. Consider the following hypothetical situation; You are attend- 
ing a speech, and during the question and answer period, you and a few friends try to 
monopolize conversation with a barrage of questions to the speaker about, say. Bob Pass. 
Isn't it clear that your behavior only serves to disrupt the speech, thereby abridging both 
the speaker's right to free speech and the listeners' right to free association? "Disturbing 
assemblies " statutes exist to deter such disruption and to safeguard the rights of speaker 
and audience. 

Consider now a BAI call-in show that has, say, a thousand listeners, ten of whom are 
vociferously persistent Pass fans. This one percent of the audience could bombard the host 
with Pass questions. Do you think these callers would not be infringing the rights of the 
host, and the other ninety-nine percent of the audience? Perhaps one might feel he has a 
constitutional right to be obnoxious, but clearly the program host is under no constitution- 
al imperative to put up with such crap. The response should be easy and instantaneous: 
politely hang up. 

Disregard of minimal rules of decorum will completely vitiate the commitment of free 
radio to provide interesting and enjoyable programs. Perhaps these callers with the irrel- 
evant questions are lonely and crying out for help. But if one is concerned with this prob- 
lem, a solution would be a program to discuss loneliness and alienation— or a program for 
which no call is irrelevant. 

Our problem probably has little to do with free speech or free radio, but it has a lot to do 
with manners. But an appeal to good manners is often considered reactionary. Perhaps, 
for those who consider manners a bourgeois affectation, the debate is better joined by 
appeals to free radio and free speech. 

—Daniel J. O'Meara, Jr. 

Daniel J. O'Meara has never heard Radio Utmameable or any program with Bob Fass. 

We hope this will be a regular column presenting differing views concerning freedom of 
speech. 



J5 



%,id*f 



3:00 AMERICAN PIE 

Live radio and recorded rock and roll, vtith 
Ira Leibin. 

7:00 ROOM 101 

Live radio with Steve Post. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
Presented by Jude Quintiere 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 



ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY 
BLACKLIST: THE THIRTIETH 
ANNIVERSARY 

A program commemorating this anni- 
versary, originally presented in Janu- 
ary at the Stephen Wise Free Synagogue 
and featuring Ring Lardner, Jr., Ossie 
Davis, Howard DaSilva, Martha 
Schlamme, Eliot Asinof and Jay Gor- 
ney. They talk of the blacklist, their 
encounters with it, and the need for 
continued vigilance to prevent a repeti- 
tion of this historical period. 



1:30 A TASTE OF THE BLUES 

Part Three of Tom Pomposello's docu- 
mentary on the history of the New York 
City blues scene. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
Members of Consumers Union, (who pub- 
lish Consumer Reports) talk about Penny 
Power, their consumer magazine for urban 
children. 



h 

4:00 THE NEXT SWAN > 

Live radio with Mickey Waldman. '* 

.r 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6: 15 COMMUNI"rY BULLETIN BOARD 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:30 URBAN FREE DELIVERY 

A weekly radio magazine, with interviews, 
news analysis and features. Produced by 
Celeste Wesson and the Public Affairs De- 
partment. 

8:30 HOW TO READ DONALD DUCK 

June Nash, anthropology professor at City 
College, interviews Ariel Dorfmann, Chil- 
ean exile and co-author of How to Read 
Donald Duck, about political events and 
about his book. Produced by Celeste 
Wesson. 

9:00 EVERYWOMANSPACE 

The first in a series of interviews with wom- 
en working in womens history, anthropol- 
ogy, and related fields. Produced by Eileen 
Zaiisk. 

10:00 JAZZ SAMPLER 
Teddy Wilson, Part Two: Teddy as leader 
and sideman, including the famous Billie 
Holiday small group recordings, and Wil- 
sons involvement in some of the original 
recordings of the bop movement. Presented 
by Bill Parrar. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE FAMILY ELECTRIC THEATRE 
INITIALLY PRESENTS 
F.E.T. on BAI, with the ITT. report on 
the S.E.C., sent COD., delivered D.O.A. 
Live (7) radio with Andy Bleiberg, Mike 
Teitelbaum, and Nick Petron. 

pages 



GEORGE PLIMPTON: 



Continued from page 3. 



BK: In Shadow Box, you describe arrangements you'd made for two exhibition 
matches — one with Archie Moore and another with Muhammad Ali. Did you 
have fantasies at any point of winning either of those matches? 
GP: Absolutely none. I'm not built like a fighter. And I've had no training at it. 
Although I did train for six months to get ready for Mr. Moore, I knew that I was 
doomed. And, indeed, I found out very much what it was like, because he had an 
idea I was somebody else — somebody who was trying to show him up. He'd been 
led to believe this by a friend of mine who put the idea into his mind sort of 
satanically. So Moore was very suspicious in the first round. He threw out some 
very stiff punches. And my nose collapsed. And there was quite a lot of bleeding. 
What I hope to have happen as a participatory journalist — to use that awful 
phrase — is for things to be very much like they would be if you woke up one 
morning in the process of having a Walter Mitty dream and realized that you 
really did have to get into the ring with a champion. And so you have to hope 
that the situation is going to be as realistic as possible, which, of course, means 
that humiliation is assured — because the amateur in the ring with a great profes- 
sional has no chance. 

BK : Shadow Box must've taken you ten years or so to put together. 
GP; It does cover ten years of what I remember about boxing, 'cause I was sent 
by Sports Illustrated — which I work for — to cover the Muhammad Ali-Liston 
fight. So from the very beginning I covered Ali's career. And he's sort of the great 
focal figure in the book. There's also a great sense of guilt that a lot of us had 
when we couldn't really do very much to help Ali, when he refused to join the 
Army in Houston — and he had his title taken away from him. He spent a little 
over three years actually in limbo — unable to fight, unable to practice his profes- 
sion. The Boxing Commission's decision to take his title away was eventually 
overruled by a Supreme Court decision: You can't take a man's profession away 
from him because he doesn't want to fight in the Army. But we all had tried to 
help Ali without any luck at all — so that there was a feeling that this man had lost 
his heavyweight championship, and we couldn't legally get it back. So that fight 
in Zaire— when he won the championship back on his own against George Fore- 
man — I thought was the greatest sports spectacle I've ever seen. Ali won the title 
back in the purest way — by doing it himself. So that was highly dramatic. And it 
sort of provided a framework for this book. Shadow Box. You see, an assuage- 
ment of guilt is also part of what the book is about; and ties it, I think, together. 
Because the whole book is about people taking matters into their own hands — not 
only prize fighters; but writers, gangsters. There's a whole bevy of people I seem 
to have stuck in there, who point up this principle of finally doing something on 
your own — cutting through the nonsense. There's something very appealing 
about seeing that work. 

He shouted at me, 
"Do you think you can do any better?" 



BK : Shadow Box describes a couple of fights that you had with Ernest Heming- 
way. The verbal one dealt with your interview with him for The Paris Review. 
GP: Well, they weren't really fights, you know. I think he was impatient at the 
amount of time that I was asking of him. He was a terrific professional and 
always felt bothered — particularly, I think, toward the end of his life — by tele- 
phones and by reporters and by being kept from his work. And here I was: 
another one — a person coming down there and bothering him with questions 
about writing. And he was a prickly man to interview on that subject, because he 
thought that it was a private task — and it was hurt by people nibbling away at it, 
asking questions. And so the interview with him which was done for The Paris 
Review does show that. I'd asked him about the significance of birds in some of 
his short stories — these white birds that suddenly appear. They usually appear 
when there's a sex scene. He doesn't have too many sex scenes, but there always 
seems to be a bird floating around. And the one that carhe to my mind is the bird 
that flies out of the gondola in Across the River and Into the Trees ; when Colonel 
Cantwell is making love to the princess, and all of a sudden a white bird flies out 
of the gondola. What on earth could that be? I mean it's such a surprising thing in 
Hemingway, who was not really given to that type of symbolism. Sometimes he 
talks about the high ground and the low ground — these sort of geographic, sym- 
bolic places. The hills being the pure place. And the valleys and bogs being the 
opposite. But what on earth was this thing flying out of the gondola? Well, I 
remember asking him. And he really got upset. He thought I was being critical 
about this white bird. And I was just curious. I wasn't being critical at all. But, I 
remember, he shouted at me, "Do you think you can do any better?" — which was 
a hell of a thing for this great writer to yell at someone of my tender years and no 
track record. Of course I couldn't do better. But he was very sensitive about 
things like that. They weren't really fights. They were just displays of pique and 
sensitivity about a craft that he cared desperately about. 

BK : I guess he had arguments with just about everybody he knew at one time or 
another. It may have been a means of isolating himself. 

GP: I think he did isolate himelf from a lot of people — like Archibald MacLeish, 
F. Scott Fitzgerald, and a lot of his Paris friends. I don't know why he did that. 
The answer most people come up with was that he was such an intensely com- 
petitive person that that's the way he began to think about most people — particu- 
larly writers. . . . 



The entire interview with George Plimpton will be broadcast at 11PM, Saturday, 
March 4th. 



page 6 




5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF 

The Friday morning science fiction extrava- 
ganza, with Jim Freund. 

7:00 ROOM 101 

Live radio with Steve Post. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 

Presented by Bill Hellerman. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOIJNCEMENTS 

URBAN FREE DELIVERY 

A public affairs magazine, rebroadcast 
from March 2. 

1 :00 TOWARD A NATIONAL 
URBAN POLICY 

Politicians and labor and business leaders 
discussed the problems of the cities and 
proposed urban policies at a conference 
held last fall by the New Democratic Forum, 
a Democratic group formed to influence the 
urban policy programs of the Carter ad- 
ministration. Produced by Gregory Firaga. 
(Rebroadcast.) 

1:30 GRASS ROOTS OF MUSIC 

Kathy Kaplan and Frank Mare present the 
best of traditional and old-time blue-grass 
music. Produced by Don Wade. 

3 : 00 BREAD AND ROSES 

Consumerism and health, with Jay Miller. 

4 : 00 THE NEXT SWAN 

Live radio with Mickey Waldman. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:15 WHAT'S UP? 

A program about astronomy and the known 
universe, with Dr. Mark Chartrand, chair- 
man of the American Museum Hayden 
Planetarium. Produced by Mark Chartrand 
and Jim Freund. 

8:00 GAY RAP 

First Friday: A free-form show, produced 
by David Wynyard. 

10:00 SCRAPPLE FROM THE APPLE 

Jazz with Jamie Katz. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LISTENING WITH WATSON 

Live radio and classical music with Bill 
Watson. 




5:00 A LONG TIME COMING 
AND A LONG TIME GONE 
Live radio with Stacyann Pober. 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

8:30 THE KID SHOW 

With Bill Greene and special guests. 

11:00 THE GOLDEN AGE OF RADIO 
From the Black Mass series we present The 
Outsider by HP. Lovecrafl, and The Jolly 
Corner by Henry lames. Produced for 
WBAlbyPaulWunder. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LUNCHPAIL 

Live radio with Paul Gorman. 



2:00 THE PIPER IN THE 
MEADOW STRAYING 
Folk and folk-based music from the British 
Isles and North America. Produced by Ed- 
ward Haber. 

3:00 WOMEN'STUDIES 

THE THIRD ANNUAL 
ROBIN MORGAN READING 

The poet reads from her newest works. 
Produced and hosted by Viv Sutherland. 

4:00 EL RINCON CALIENTE 

Latin music with Carlos De Leon. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

With Abraham Aig. 

7 : 30 THE DOCU-DRAM A DEBATE : 
TELEVISION AS HISTORY 

NBC's recent six-hour film on the political 
career of Martin Luther King is the latest 
example of docu-drama — a television mov- 
ie based on a dramatization of actual his- 
torical events. The film's impacl on view- 
ers, its accuracy, its portrayal of the civil 
rights movement, and FBI involvement in 
the movement's demise, will be discussed 
by media reviewers, television people and 
civil rights workers Produced by Paul 
Heath Hoeffel. 

8:00 MARION'S CAULDRON 

Occult news and this month's astrological 
transits, with Marion Weinstein. 

9:00 FREE MUSIC STORE 
To be announced. 

11:00 AN INTERVIEW WITH 
GEORGE PLIMPTON 

Bill Kortum talks with the author of Shad- 
ow Box (G.P. Putnam) a book dealing with 
the dramatic confrontations in boxing, 
death fantasies, and life. George Plimpton 
is a founder of The Paris Review and co- 
editor of The Paris Review Interviews: 
Writers at Work (Viking/Penguin). He has 
also written many books on sports, (the 
best known, perhaps, is Paper Lion), and is 
a contributor to Sports Illustrated and an 
associate editor of Harper's Magazine. 

12:00 THE LATE NEWS 

With Abraham Aig. 

PLEASE NOTE: It is this edition of the 
weekend news that will be rebroadcast on 
Sunday and Monday mornings. 

PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

IN THE DARK 

Night radio with Joe Frank. 




5:00 SOUNDTRACK 
Live radio with Paul Wunder: rapping 
about the cinema, news, film, music, movie 
reviews, LIVE phone-in. 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

Last nights late news, with Abraham Aig. 



8:30 HERE OF A SUNDAY MORNING 

Early and baroque music, presented by 
Chris Whent. 

11:00 IN THE SPIRIT 

Spiritual discussions with Lex Hixon. 

1:00 THE VELVET SLEDGEHAMMER 
A women's magazine of the air, featuring 
Hot Flashes from Majority Report, plus 
reviews, media notes and reports from the 
entire range of women's activities. Pro- 
duced by the Women's Department. 

March Folio 



2:30 THE SUNDAY AFTERNOON 
GOSPEL PROGRAM 

A weekly •.urvey of one of the richest and 
.Tiost sadly neglected of all the American 
musical traditions— presented by Leonard 
Lopate. 

4:00 WELCOME TO OUR WORLD 

Live radio with Ellis Hai^lip. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

With Abraham Aig. 

7:00 THROUGH THE 
OPERA GLASS 

The recordings of Enrico Caruso, Part 
Eleven, and 'lie last in this series. Pre- 
sented by Martin Sokol. 

9:30 AUDIO EXPERIMENTAL THEATER 
Tom Johnson : Bedford Street. 
"It's a slow night at the neighborhood bar. 
A stout man with a red nose is downing 
another bourbon and water at the rear of 
the bar. Next to him, a stout man with a 
crooked nose is drinking a stein of beer. 
Near the middle of the bar a man is smok- 
ing a cigar and drinking a glass of beer. . . " 
Tom Johnson performs Bedford Street on 
the streets of New York City. Produced by 
MikeSappol. 

12:00 THE LATE NEWS 

With Abraham Aig. 

PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THOUGHT BALLOON 

When radio broadcaster Mike Sappol and 
his badly injured pilot were rescued after 
forty-nine days in the frozen wilderness, 
the story made headlines around the world. 
How could they have survived seven long 
weeks without food and water? What kept 
them going? What did they thmk about 
during those desperate days of cold, pain 
and hunger? A story of remarkable cour- 
age, abiding faith, unquenchable hope a 
miracle behind the microphone. . . as told 
',iy MikeSappol. 



tfei&y 






(J 



5:00 LIVE RADIO 

With Beaumont Small. 

7:00 THE MONDAY MORNING SHOW 

Live radio with Clayton Riley. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
NEWS REBROADCAST 



9:30 MORNING MUSIC 

If you don't read this copy, you will 
have an eerie flash of deja-entendu. 
James Irsay got a job at V\TIU but they 
send his tapes here when they're done 
with them, for which we thank them. 
A sedate, considered program of clas- 
sical music starring James Irsay. 

11:00 PHILIP GLASS ENSEMBLE- 
KITCHEN CONCERT 
Music from Einstein on the Beach: En- 
semble Train and Ensemble and Chorus 
Spaceship. Recorded in concert at the 
Kitchen on March 19, 1976. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MORE THAN HALF THE WORLD 

Live radio with ludie Pasternak. 

2:00 STRICKLY ROOTS 

Ri-ggae with Roger Trilling 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

School lunch programs— how they work. 
who pays for them, and how school dis- 
tricts can run their own programs. Coor- 
dinated by Linda LaViolette. 

March Folio 



4:00 ADVENTURES IN JAZZ 
With Mickey Bass. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:15 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:15 AMNESTY ACTION 

Larry Cox of Amnesty International with a 
program on human rights in South Africa. 

7:30 THOR'S HAMMER: A WEEKLY 
REVIEW OF THE ARTS 
Mostly of poetry and fiction, presented by 
Joe Cuomo. 

9:00 OUR CfTY, OUR LFVES 

Dr. Jean Stellman, author of Women's 
Work, Women's Health, talks about occu- 
pational health and safety conditions and 
regulations, and how they affect working 
women. Produced by Celeste Wesson. 

10:00 THE BREAD GIVERS 

Wherein the Smolinskv family, beset 
by financial difficulties, race eviction 
from their tenement aoartment on Hes- 
ter Slre'?i. Wit!t oommentar^' by his- 
torian Alice Kessler Harris. Directed 
by Nina Mende, and produced by Beth 
Friend, Gail Pellett and Nina Mende. 



Enrico Caruso in Samson and Delilah. The concluding chapter of the recordings 
of Enrico Caruso can be heard Sunday, March 5 at 7:00 P.M. on THROUGH 
THE OPERA GLASS. 



11:00 ELECTRONIC MUSIC 
Presented by Ilhan Mimaroglu. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

ROUND MIDNIGHT 

Leonard Lopate's guest tonight is jazz saxo- 
phonist Benny Wallace, who will discuss 
his music and play some rare concert tapes. 



n 



\f£iJL^ 



7 



5:00 5KYLITE 

Live radio with Linda Perry. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
l^egarding Broadway — "New Faces of 
1952". (1952??) Another look backward to 
the days when a balcony seat cost $2.30. 
Produced by Lynn Samuels. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 



OPERATION THUNDERBOLT 

This was the computer-selected code name 
for the Israeli rescue mission that freed 104 
hijacked hostages from Entebbe in Uganda. 
Paul Wunder interviews Menahem Golan, 
director of the Israeli "spectacular" docu- 
menting the event, as well as two women 
who were hostages aboard the plane. Pro- 
duced by Paul Wunder. 

1 : 00 THOR'S HAMMER : A WEEKLY 
REVIEW OF THE ARTS 
Rebroadcast from March 6. 

1 : 30 THE LATIN MUSICIANS HOUR 
With Max Salazar. 

3 : 00 BREAD AND ROSES 
The Grey Panthers. 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 
With Pepsi Charles. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:15 ALTERNATIVE ARTS ACCESS 

A small press newsletter, with Joe Cuomo. 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

After the news: Hot Flashes, women's news 
from Majority Report. 

page? 



7:30 ILLUMINATIONS 
A show exploring the life, people and issues 
of New York City, as well as reports from 
our elected officials in Washington. Pro- 
duced by Bill Lynch. 

8:30 CARIBBEAN CURRENTS 

News and reviews of life in the Islands, 
with Annette Walker. 

9:00 THE REAL LIVE LESBIAN SHOW 
With Carmen Garcia and Rebecca Tron. 

10:00 WEATHERBIRD 

lazz with Gary Giddins. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CASUAL LABOR 

Live radio with David Levine. 




INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY 

A day of special programs, in which all the 
usual programs will be heard, but with an 
unusual emphasis on women. 

5:00 EARTHWATCH 

Live radio with Robert Knight. 

7:00 RADIO CITY 

Live radio with Sara Fishko. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 

With Eileen Kane's help, we explore the 

world of female composers. Produced by 

Manya. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY: 
WOMEN FROM MANY COUNTRIES 
Originally produced for International 
Women's Day, 1976, by Viv Sutherland. 

1 : 30 THAT'S THE WAY I LIKE IT 

Popular music, presented by Georgia 
Christgau. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

Eileen Zalisk interviews Claudine Dreifus, 
editor of Seizing Our Bodies: The Politics 
of Women's Health, about the history, poli- 
tics and current state of health care for 



4:00 PRAXIS 

Live radio with Margot Adler. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:15 SPECTRUM: CONVERSATIONS 
ABOUT AUDIO 

Women in Audio: career opportunities for 
women in the field. Hosted by Marilyn 
Reis. 

8 : 00 THE POETRY AND PROSE OF H.D. 

H.D. (Hilda Doolittle) is one of the major 
poets of this century, yet her work is only 
now receivirife the recognition it deserves. 
Her books of poetry include Helen in Egypt 
{Grove Press), Trilogy (New Directions) 
and Hermetic Definitions (ND); her prose 
includes Tribute to Freud (Godine Press): 
her fiction. Bid Me to Live (Grove). This 
program includes excerpts from a panel 
discussion of her work, with Marilyn 
Hacker, Marie Ponsot, Richard Howard, 
and Elizabeth Janeway. Produced by Marie 
Ponsot and Joe Cuomo. 

page 8 



9:30 WOMEN IN JAZZ: PART TWO. 

Three hours of discussion and recorded 
music by women jazz instrumentalists. Pro- 
duced by Dick Sudhalter and Bill Farrar. 



12:30 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S NIGHT 
Live radio with Viv Sutherland and Judie 
Pasternak. 



5:00 AMERICAN PIE 

Live radio and recorded music with Ira 

Leibin. 



7:00 ROOM 101 

Live radio with Steve Post. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCMEENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 

Presented by Judy Sherman. 



8:30 WOMEN IN SCIENCE 

An interview with Judith Randall, science 
writer for the New York Daily News and 
author of many articles on science and 
medicine. In this interview, she discusses 
her work as a science writer and recent 
issues she has covered, such as recombinant 
DNA, mammography, and influenza. Pro- 
duced by Eileen Zalisk. 

9:00 EVERYWOMANSPACE 
Donna Allegra interviews Helen Toppins 
and Lori Sharpe of the Black Feminist Net- 
work. The participants explore a liberation 
politics for which both feminism and black 
politics have been insufficient. This pro- 
gram is one of a scries. 

10:00 A DELICATE BALANCE 

Jazz with Marian McPartland. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE FAMILY ELECTRIC THEATRE PRE- 
SENTS— F.E. MINUS T. . . . 
Andy drives Nick and Mike to distraction, 
Mike drives Andy and Nick crazy, and 
Nick and Mike drive Andy to the airport. 
Mike and Nick in the studio, Andy in a 
phone booth with lots of quarters. Live 
radio with N. Petron, A. Bleiberg and M. 
Teitelbaum. 




Connie Crothers is featured on WOMEN IN JAZZ: 
Part Two, Thursday, March 8 at 9:30 P.M. 



12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

HOUSING NOTEBOOK 

With Esther Rand of the Metropolitan 
Council on Housing. 

1 : 30 A TASTE OF THE BLUES 

Pull your windowshade down, push the 
tables back. Get out on the floor and let's 
ball and jack. Presented by Howard John- 
son. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

Crime and Punishment. Dave Greenberg 
speaks with Barbara Schwartz of the 
N.Y.U. Law School, about women in 
prisons. 

4:00 THE NEXT SWAN 

feive radio with Mickey Waldman. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6: 15 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 

6:30 NEWS_ 

Wiih Marty Goldensohn. 

7:30 URBAN FREE DELIVERY 

A weekly radio magazine, with interviews, 
news analysis and features, produced by 
Celeste Wesson and the Public Affairs 
Department. 



/»^I<U' 



//o 



5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF 

The Friday morning science fiction extrava- 
ganza, with Jim Freund. 

7:00 ROOM 101 

Live radio with Steve Post. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
Presented by Bill Howie. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

URBAN FREE DELIVERY 

A public affairs magazine, rebroadcast from 

March 9. 

1:00 OPERA NOTEBOOK 
With Martin Sokol. 



1:30 GRASS ROOTS OF MUSIC 

Kathy Kaplan and Frank Mare present the 
best of traditional and old-time bluegrass 
music. Produced by Don Wade. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

Community Action with Luana Robinson. - 

4:00 THE NEXT SWAN 

Live radio with Mickey Waldman. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:15 WHAT'S UP? 

A program on astronomy and the known 
universe, with Dr. Mark Chartrand, chair- 
man of the American Mustum Hayden 
Planetarium. Produced by Mark Chartrand 
and Jim Freund. 

8:00 GAY RAP 

The Gay Community and City Hall : Part 

One. Produced by Greg Gazis and Larry 

Chan. 

10:00 SCRAPPLE FROM THE APPLE 

Jazz with Jamie Katz. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LISTENING WITH WATSON 

Live radio and classical music with Bill 
Watson. 



52sf^l>Ua 



II 



5 : 00 CLOSING THE GAP BETWEEN 
POSTAL RATES AND PHILOSOPHY 

Walked until I found the building that was 
all schools in one. In the gym on the ground 
floor they were holding a Four Hour Silent ' 
Moratorium Against the War. All the dem- 
onstrators were supposed to sit on foldit\g 
chairs in the dark and keep silent for four 
hours. But when I looked in, they were con- 
versing, though still in the dark. Live radio 
with Jessica Raimi. 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

8:30 THE KID SHOW 

With Bill Greene and special guests. 

11 : 00 THE GOLDEN AGE OF RADIO 

We continue with the Black Mass series, 
presenting The Death of H<ilpin Frayzcr 
and The Moonlit Road, adapted from sto- 
ries by Ambrose Bierce. Produced for 
WBAI by Paul Wu.ider. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LUNCHPAIL 

Live radio with Paul Gorman. 

2:00 THE PIPER IN THE 
MEADOW STRAYING 

Folk and folk-based music from North 
America and the British Isles, presented by 
Edward Haber. 

3:00 WOMEN'S STUDIES 

Women in Switzerland. Viv Sutherland 
talks with Swiss feminist Gret Haller. 

4:00 EL RINCON CALIENTE 

Latin music with Carlos De Leon. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

With Abraham Aig. 

7 : 00 AVAILABLE TO YOU AND ME 

Lydia Sillman and Barbara Haspel of the 
New York State Council on the Arts talk 
about media and public access grants. Pro- 
duced by Nina Mende. 

March Folio 



8:00 GROW YOUR OWN 

Urban ecology with Liz Christy. 

9:00 FREE MUSIC STORE 

To be announced. 

11:00 RITES OF PASSAGE 

An exploration of rites of passage. Some of 
the speakers are from a forthcoming psy- 
chology conference. Produced by Linda 
Perry and Susannah Lippman. 

12:00 THE LATE NEWS 
With Abraham Aig. 

PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

IN THE DARK 

Night radio with Joe Frank. 



^i/I^U, 



/ 



12 



5:00 SOUNDTRACK 
Live radio with Paul Wunder: rapping a- 
bout the cinema, film music, movie re- 
views, interviews, LIVE phone-in. 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

8:30 HERE OF A SUNDAY MORNING 

Early and baroque music, with Chris 
Whent. 

11:00 IN THE SPIRIT 

Spiritual discussions with Lex Hixon. 

1:00 THE VELVET SLEDGEHAMMER 

A women's magazine of the air, featuring 
Hot Flashes from Majority Report, plus 
reviews, media notes and reports from the 
entire range of women's activities. Pro- 
duced by the Women's Department. 

2:30 THE SUNDAY AFTERNOON 
GOSPEL PROGRAM 

A weekly survey of one of the richest and 
most sadly neglected of all the American 
musical traditions— presented by Leonard 
Lopate. 

4:00 WELCOME TO OUR WORLD 

Live radio with Ellis Haizlip and Bill Lynch. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

With Abraham Aig. 

7:00 THROUGH THE OPERA GLASS 
Ciela's Adriana Le Couvreur, presented by 
Martin Sokol. 

9:30 LIVE FROM THE NUYORICAN 
POET'S CAFE 

Music, poetry, radio drama, interviews. 

12:00 THE LATE NEWS 
With Abraham Aig. 

PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

TOOTH AND CLAW 

The mfinite variety of quality in sound is 
reduced to order by the exact and simple 
law of radio in quantity. The system so 
defined still contains the unlimited element 
in blank intervals, but the unlimited is no 
longer a timeless continuum 
More with Mike Sappol. 





9:00 OUR CITY, OUR LIVES 

Featuring the National Black Feminists Re- 
port with Donna Allegra. Produced by 
Elaine Baly. 



5:00 LIVE RADIO 

With Beaumont Small. 

7:00 THE MONDAY MORNING SHOW 
Live radio with Clayton Riley. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
Early music with "Six ". 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MORE THAN HALF THE WORLD 

Live radio with Judie Pasternak. 

2:00 STRICKLY ROOTS 

Reggae with Roger Trilling. 



10:00 THE BREAD GIVERS 

In which Rcb Smolinsky stands trial, 
and Mrs. Smolinsky reminisces about 
life in the old country. With com- 
mentary by historian Alice Kessler 
Harris. Directed by Nina Mende, and 
produced by Beth Friend, Gail Pelletl 
and Nina Mende. 



11:00 HEARING MUSIC 

A program on music and sound — what 
they might be, and how you can enjoy and 
use them. Tonight, rhythm— what we all 
got. Produced by Jim Theobald. 



12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

ROUND MIDNIGHT 

An evening with contributors to Paranoids 
Anonymous Newsletter, hosted by Leonard 
Lopate. 




Tape is in short supply at the station. 



March Folio 



3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

The Foundation for Alternate Cancer Ther- 
apies (F.A.C.T) What are your chances 
with cancer? 

4:00 ADVENTURES IN JAZZ 
With Mickey Bass. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:15 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:30 THORS HAMMER: A WEEKLY 

REVIEW OF THE ARTS 

Mostly of poetry and fiction. Presented this 

week by Wesley Brown. Produced by Joe 

Cuomo. 

8:00 THE ITALIAN COMMUNIST 
PARTY-HISTORIC COMPROMISE 
OR HISTORIC COP-OUT? 

The Italian Communist Party holds Italy's 
future in its hands. While it has enormous 
strength in the trade unions, and controls 
many important municipal governments, it 
faces opposition from the left, the right, the 
outside and the inside. In this program we'll 
attempt to clarify some of these divisions 
and criticisms, and to predict whether 
Italy's future and that of the Party are one. 
Produced by Judith Murray and Dave 
Metzger. 




5:00 SKYLITE 

Live radio with Linda Perry. 

7 : 00 THE TUESDAY MORNING SHOW 

Live radio with Clayton Riley. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 

Presented by Gregory Reeve. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEW YORK AS YOU DONT KNOW IT 

This time, it's about the wonders of Queens. 
Find out about them when Barbara Londin 
speaks with Sidney Horenstein. 



1:00 THORS HAMMER: A WEEKLY 
REVIEW OF THE ARTS 

Rebroadcast from March 13. 

1:30 SOUNDS OF BRAZIL 
Brazilian popular music, presented by Mil- 
dred Norman. 

3:00 PRE AD AND ROSES 
The Day Care Action Coalition. 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 
With Pepsi ChaHes. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:15 ALTERNATIVE ARTS ACCESS 

A small press newsletter, with Joe Cuomo. 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

After the news: Hot Flashes, women's news 
from Majority Report. 

7:30 ILLUMINATIONS 
A show exploring the life, people and issues 
of New York City, as well as reports from 
our elected officials in Washington. Pro- 
duced by Bill Lynch. 

8:30 EAST SIDE, WEST SIDE 

Annette Samuels brings her expertise from 
Community News Service to WBAI. 

9:00 THE REAL LIVE LESBIAN SHOW 

With Rebecca Tron and Carmen Garcia. 

10:00 WEATHERBIRD 

Jazz with Gary Ciddins. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CASUAL LABOR 

Live radio with David Levine. 




5:00 EARTHWATCH 

Live radio with Robert Knight. 

7:00 RADIO CITY 
-Live radio with Sara Fishko. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
Jim Theobald presents the marvels of twen- 
tieth century unpopular music. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE VELVET SLEDGEHAMMER 

A one-hour version, rebroadcast from 
sometime in the past. A women's magazine 
of the air, with news, media notes, and 
reports from the whole range of women's 
activities. Produced by the Women's De- 
partment. 

1:00 ELPUENTE 

A program about neighborhood organizing 

in Hispanic communities. Produced by 

Angel Aviles, Joe Cuomo and Marcos 

Miranda. 

1:30 PRAIRIE ECHOES 

An all-western music program, including 
western swing, cowboy and forties-style 
country music, hosted by Paul Aaron. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

A welfare help line, coordinated by the 
Radical Alliance of Social Service Workers. 

4:00 PRAXIS 

Live radio with Paul Mclsaac. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

page 9 



WOMEN WRITERS 
WANTED 




Short submissions wanted for on-air 
discussion and possible use as Folio 
features. 

Send short works in progress (two 
copies, please) before March 10, to: 

Viv Sutherland and Kate Ellis 

WBAI, 359 East 62 Street 

New York, New York 10021 

A selection of the works we receive 
will be read and discussed on WOM- 
EN'S STUDIES: A ROOM OF ONE'S 
OWN, on Saturday, March 18 at 
3:00 P M (See program listing for 
details.) 

DEADLINE: 
MARCH 10 



6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:15 REPORT TO THE LISTENER 

Rick Harris cogently explains every- 
thing you, the listener, have been wonder- 
ing about. 

8:00 HOUSE OF MAGIC 

BILL GLINN: AN INTERVIEW 

AND READING 

The author of The Black Picture Show and 

Gunji and Hess is interviewed by director 

Oz Scott and playwright Aisha Rahman. 

Produced by Steve Cannon. 

9:30 A READING BY MERVYN TAYLOR 

Taylors poetry has appeared in Black Cre- 
ation, Rock Against the Wind and 360 
Degrees of Blackness Coming At You. Pro- 
duced by Wesley Brown. 

10:00 BIX AND BEYOND 

Jazz with Dick Sudhalter. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LFVE FROM THE NUYORICAN 
POET'S CAFE 

Live music, radio drama, interviews, 
poetry. 



Wn^, 



7m 



3:00 To be announced. 

5:00 AMERICAN PIE 

Live radio and rock-and-roll music, with 

Ira Leibin. 

7:00 ROOM 101 

Live radio with Steve Post. 

page 10 



9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 

Happy birthday, Christa Ludwigl Best 

wishes from Manya. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

POLITICAL POSSIBILITIES FOR 
ECOLOGICAL FUTURES 

A talk given by Sheldon Wolin, author and 
professor of politics at Princeton Univer- 
sity. This lecture is one of a series given last 
fall at Ramapo College of New Jersey. 

1:00 PLANETARY CrriZENS 

More than 200.000 people in over sixty 
countries have been issued planetary pass- 
ports by Planetary Citizens, an advisory 
body to the United Nations. Donald Keys, 
registrar of Planetary Citizens, discusses 
the passport, the movement from national 
to global consciousness, national "person- 
alities", and the correlation between per- 
sonal development and political struggle. 
Interview by Robert Knight. 

1:30 A TASTE OF THE BLUES 

Part Four of Tom Pomposello's history of 
the New York City blues scene. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

To be armounced. 

4:00 THE NEXT SWAN 

Live radio writh Mickey Waldman. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:15 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:30 URBAN FREE DELIVERY 

A weekly radio magazine, with interviews, 
news analysis and features, produced by 
Celeste Wesson and the Public Affairs De- 
partment. 

8:30 RADIO ACTIVrrY 

A report on nuclear energy and the anti- 
nuclear movement. Produced by Jon Kalish. 

9:00 EVERYWOMANSPACE 

THE HOSPUS: DYING WITH DIGNITY 

A look at the hospus and its role in assisting 
the terminally ill and their families, with 
nurses who work at the Hospus in St. 
Luke's Hospital. Produced by Rosemarie 
Reed. 

10:00 JAZZ SAMPLER 
Jimmy Rushing and Joe Turner. Two hours 
with the masters of the southwest style. 
Presented by Bill Farrar. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE FAMILY ELECTRIC THEATER 
PRESENTS FORGOTTEN 
CHILDHOOD FRIENDS. . . . 

Bucky Beaver, Speedy Alka Seltzer, Mr. 
Dirt, Mr. Clean, Mr. Pain, the Gold Dust 
Twins, the N.B.C. Peacock, Froggy, 
Clowny, Speedo and Mr. Earl. A nostalgic 
tiptoe through people you have loved and 
eaten, but not necessarily in that order. 
Live radio with Michael Teitelbaum, Nick 
Petron, and Andy Bleiberg. 



fvtWyy 



5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF 

The Friday morning science fiction extrava- 
ganza, with Jim Freund. 

7:00 ROOM 101 

Live radio with Steve Post. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 



9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
Presented by Ted Cohen. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

URBAN FREE DELIVERY 

A weekly magazine of public ^lffairs. Re- 
broadcast from March 16. 



1:00 RADIOACTIVITY 
Jon Kalish examines the nuclear industry 
and the anti-nuclear movement. Rebroad- 
cast from March 16. 



1 :30 IRISH REBEL THEATER 

This program was recorded at New 
York's Abbey Theater on November 
19, 1972. It features the Chieftains, an 
Irish group, for the first time in the 
United States, and includes perfor- 
mances by Ron Duncan, Katholeen 
Kemohan and Brian Herron. The con- 
cert includes folk ballads, IRA. and 
civil rights songs, and a reading from 
The Toin, a work of Irish oral litera- 
ture. This program was recorded by 
Mickey Waldman and Judy Sherman, 
and produced by Bill Wurst. 



3 : 00 BREAD AND ROSES 

Community report from the Columbia 
Tenants Uruon. 

4:00 THE NEXT SWAN 

Live radio with Mickey Waldman. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensofm. 

7:15 WHAT'S UP? 

A program about astronomy and the known 
universe, with Dr. Mark Chartrand, chair- 
man of the American Museum Hayden 
Planetarium . Produced by Mark Chartrand 
and Jim Freund. 

8:00 GAY RAP 

With Greg Gazis, Frank Richter and Da\'id 

Wynyard. 

10:00 SCRAPPLE FROM THE APPLE 
Jazz with Jamie Katz. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LISTENING WITH WATSON 

Live radio and classical music, with Bill 
Watson. 



//3 



5:00 A LONG TIME COMING 
AND A LONG TIME GONE 

Live radio with Stacyann Pober. 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
NEWS REBROADCAST 

8:30 THE KID SHOW 

With Bill Greene and special guests. 

11:00 THE GOLDEN AGE OF RADIO 

We conclude our rebroadcast of the Black 
Mass series with The Squaw by Bram 
Stoker, Proof Positive by Graham Greene, 
and The Witch of the Willows by Lord 
Dunsany. Produced for WBAI by Paul 
Wunder. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LUNCHPAIL 

Live radio with Paul Gorman. 

2:00 THE PIPER IN THE 
MEADOW STRAYING 

Folk and folk-based music from the British 
Isles and North America. Produced by Ed- 
ward Haber. 



3:00 WOMEN'S STUDIES 
A Room of One's Own. The second in a 
series of on-the-air creative writing work- 
shops for women. 

(Short works in progress for discussion and 
possible publication as Folio features should 
be submitted by March 10.) Hosted by Viv 
Sutherland and Kate Ellis. Produced by Viv 
Sutherland. 

4:00 EL RINCON CALIENTE 

Latin music with Carlos De Leon. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

With Abraham Aig. 

7:00 STATIC 

Members of Congress are working on the 
first major national communications policy 
legislation since the Federal Communica- 
tions Act of 1934. Tfus week we'll discuss 
how the bill may affect our access to satel- 
lite, cable and broadcast technology. Pro- 
duced by Amie IClein. 

8:00 HALIMATOURE 

Halima talks of Muslim life, health, natviral 
medicine and herbs, among other things. 

9:00 FREE MUSIC STORE 
To be announced. 



11:00 MAUREEN OWEN: AN 
INTERVIEW AND READING 

Maureen Owen was bom in Minnesota and 
grew up there and in California. At present 
she is program coordinator at the St. Marks 
Poetry Project in New York City, a mem- 
ber of the advisory board of CCLM (Coun- 
cil of Coordinating Literary Magazines) and 
the editor of Telephone Magazine and 
Telephone Books. 

She is the author of Coimtry Rush, The 
No Travels Journal, and most recently. 
Brass Choir Approaches the Burial Ground. 

The program is funded by a grant from 
the National Endowment of the Arts in 
Washington, DC, a federal agency. 
Produced by Susan Howe. 

12:00 THE LATE NEWS 

With Abraham Aig. 

PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

IN THE DARK 

Night radio with Joe Frank. 




5:00 SOUNDTRACK 
Live radio with Paul Wunder: rapping 
about the cinema. Film music, movie re- 
views, interviews, LIVE phone-in. 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

8:30 HERE OF A SUNDAY MORNING 
Early and baroque music, with Chris 
Whent. 

11:00 INTHESPIRrr 

Spiritual discussions with Lex Hixon. 

1:00 THE VELVET SLEDGEHAMMER 

A women's magazine of the air, featuring 
Hot Flashes from Majority Report, plus 
news, media notes, and reports from the 
entire range of women's activities. Pro- 
duced by the Women's Department. 

2:00 PRISONS: INSIDE AND OUT 

A day of programming (interrupted only 
for the 6:30 news) about prisons — life on 
the inside, life on the outside. Prison art, 
prison poetry, women in prisons, support 
groups (such as the Fortune Society) and 
prison music — as well as interviews with 
prisoners, and calls from former prisoners. 
Producers from the Drama and Literature, 
Urban Affairs, Public Affairs, Music, and 
Women's Departments will come together 
to work on this specicd day. Produced by 
Joe Cuomo and Elaine Baly. 

March Folio 





'^^^C(kj^ 



March foXio 



page 11 




Mulberry Street, photographer and date unknown. The scene of THE BREAD 
GIVERS by Anzia Yezierska, which can be heard in installments on Monday 
evenings at 10:00 P.M. 



12:00 THE LATE NEWS 

With Abraham Aig. 

PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

AIR HOSE 

If you finish before time is called, you may 
check your work on this section only. DO 
NOT work on any other section. With your 
proctor, Mike Sappol. 



5:00 LIVE RADIO 

With Beaumont Small. 

7:00 THE MONDAY MORNING SHOW 

Live radio with Clayton Riley. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 

He was loo much for WFIU, so they spread 
him around, and we ended up with him. It's 
really him— that exuberant cynicism we 
still talk about back here on the farm. It's 
James Irsay, not live, not in person, but 
exactly as he appeared before WFIU audi- 
ence out in Indiana, and loaned through the 
kindness of that station. 

11:00 MOTHER MALLARD'S 
PORTABLE MASTERPIECE COMPANY 
IN PERFORMANCE AT THE DIPLOMAT 
The Continuing Story of Counterpoint by 
David Borden was performed in the grand 
ballroom of the Hotel Diplomat on April 
26, 1977. David Borden, Judith Borsherand 
Chip Smith perform on Moog synthesizers 
with guest artists Joan La Barbara, soloist, 
Cindy Recker, speaker, and the Thomas 
Sokol Chorale, conducted by Mr. Sokol. 
With live mixing on location by Steve 
Drews and vocal mixing by Kurt Mankacsi, 
this recording was engineered and pro- 
duced by Edward Haber and Jim Freund. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

page 12 



MORE THAN HALF THE WORLD 

Live radio with Judie Pasternak. 

2:00 STRICKLY ROOTS 

Reggae with Roger Trilling. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

The Summer School Funding Program — 
what it is, how it works, and how com- 
munity organizations can become involved. 
Coordinated by Linda LaViolette. 

4:00 ADVENTURES IN JAZZ 

With Mickey Bass. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6 : 15 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:30 THOR'S HAMMER: A WEEKLY 
REVIEW OF THE ARTS 

Mostly of poetry and fiction, this week 
presented by Marie Ponsot. Produced by 
Marie Ponsot and Joe Cuomo. 

8:00 AT THE CORNER OF RATBUSH 
AND CHURCH : A REPORT 
FROM BROOKLYN 

When Jimmy Carter wanted to demonstrate 
his concern for urban problems, he took a 
quick tour of the South Bronx. He could 
have learned more by going to Brooklyn. 
Brooklynites, long accustomed to being the 
butt of the nation's jokes, have shown that 
city neighborhoods can be both gracious 
and humane. It isn't yet paradise, though, 
and tonight's report will focus on some 
problems still to be tackled: neighborhood 
preservation, health care, mortgage redlin- 
ing, and the new Gateway National Park. 
Produced by Abraham Aig. 

9:00 OUR CITY, OUR LIVES 

A report on women's groups and activities 
around the city, with Jerry Hatch. 



10:00 THE BREAD GIVERS 

In which Mashah and Fania have ad- 
mirers but Bessie has nobody — until 
Berel Bernstein, a shop cutter, wants to 
ask her hand in marriage. With com- 
mentary by historian Alice Kessler 
Harris. Directed by Nina Mende, and 
produced by Beth Friend, Gail Pellett 
and Nina Mende. 



11:00 GOING HOME TO CUBA 

Four young Cuban-Americans— sons and 
daughters of Cubans who fled the Revo- 
lution—recently returned to Cuba as part 
of a special brigade. In this program, they 
discuss who they overcame the anti-Cuban 
sentiments in the exile community here, 
and their impressions of Cuba. Produced 
by Paul Heath Hoeffel. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

ROUND MIDNIGHT 

If it doesn't snow tonight, Leonard Lopate's 
guest will be Bernard Brightman, founder 
of Stash Records. 






5:00 SKYLITE 

Live radio with Linda Perry. 

7 : 00 THE TUESDAY MORNING SHOW 
Live radio with Clayton Riley. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 

Presented by Judith Cohn. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

OF MORE THAN PASSING INTEREST 

THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM ART 
SCHOOL PRISON PROGRAM 

Barbara Londin talks with Harry Bernard, 
Linda Schrank, instructors; Marc Mellon, 
assistant director, and Reggie Green, schol- 
arship student and former inmate, about 
the aims and results of this program. 

1:00 THOR'S HAMMER: A WEEKLY 
REVIEW OF THE ARTS 

Rebroadcast from March 20. 

1:30 THE LATIN MUSICIANS HOUR 

With Max Salazar. 



3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

The Grey Panthers. 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 
With Pepsi Charles. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:15 ALTERNATIVE ARTS ACCESS 

A small press newsletter, with Joe Cuomo. 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

After the news : Hot Flashes, women's news 
from Majority Report. 

7:30 ILLUMINATIONS 
A show exploring the life, people and issues 
of New York City, as well as reports from 
our elected officials in Washington. Pro- 
duced by Bill Lynch. 

8: JO CARIBBEAN CURRENTS 

News and reviews of life in the Islands, 

with Annette Walker. 

9:00 THE REAL LFVE LESBIAN SHOW 

With Carmen Garcia and Rebecca Tron. 

10:00 WEATHERBIRD 

Jazz with Gary Giddins. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CASUAL LABOR 

Live radio with David Levine. 






5:00 EARTHWATCH 

An equinox celebration with Robert Knight. 

7:00 RADIO cmr 

Live radio with Sara Fishko. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 

And not any of that old-fashioned kind of 
music. Presented by Jim Theobald. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

GEORGE GERDES IN CONCERT 

"At the heart of the friendship between 
India and the United States is our deter- 
mination that the moral values of our peo- 
ple must guide the actions of our deter- 
mination that the moral values conscious 
creations of men and women who believed 
that spiritual principles could find political 
expression." 

George Gerdes explains this quote of the 
day from the New York Times of January 
4, 1978, continues with the problem of 
finding true synonyms and antonyms of the 
word "frog", and finishes with a lecture on 
the significance of the absurdist musical. 
Yucca Flats. Satirical songs, recorded at 
Kenny's Castaways on January 12, 1978 by 
Edward Haber, Bill O'Neill and Lyrui 
Samuels, from a live mix by Don Hill. 

1:00 MASTERS OF THE COMIC BOOK 
ART FORM 

Gil Kane, Part Two. Kane is the creator 
and illustrator of Star Hawks, an inno- 
vative comic strip appearing daily in the 
New York Post. Produced by Dan Stem. 

1:30 THAT'S THE WAY I LIKE rr 

Popular music with Georgia Christgau. 

3:00 BREAD AfJD ROSES 

Self-help mutual aid groups — alternatives 
to the medical and psychiatric establish- 
ment. In this program. Dr. Virginia Gold- 
ner speaks with members of various self- 
help groups. 

March Folio 



STAB AT THE SEVENTIES 



When Steve Post was a boy, he never got any mail and he envied people who 
ran to the mailbox every day to pull out what appeared to be a pile of fascinating 
communications. What he did not understand was that most of this mail was 
drugstore sale notices and alumni newsletters. 

Steve Post vowed. Til never go without letters again. When I grow up, I'll get 
so much mail, they'll have to give me my own zipcode." 

To this end, he devised the idea of contests, realizing that everyone in this 
dog-eat-dog society of ours is driven to compete, even to be first car at a red light. 
(Even this writer could not resist phoning in to a Boring Story Contest that man 
held, to exploit our compulsion to excel.) 

Now, Steve's desk is once again littered with bulging manila envelopes. We 
have taken the liberty of borrowing them and printing selections, because we felt 
that the brilliance and sensitivity expressed in these letters deserved the less 
ephemeral medium of print. 

We wish to point out that these selections do not represent Mr. Post's choices. 
The following is a scant .01 percent of the responses. These are not necessarily the 
winners or losers of this contest. We reserve to Mr. Post the right to aesthetic 
judgments. 

J.R. 



THE NEW YORK TIMES 

DATELINE: DECEMBER 31, 1979 

SAN CLEMENTE, CALIFORNIA— Richard Nixon, who resigned the presidency 

in a sea of public humiliation and lucrative book contracts, tonight announced 

his candidacy for the 1980 presidential election. 

The ex-president, looking fit after a stay in the hospital for cosmetic plastic 
surgery, announced his candidacy by saying, "The American public is quick to 
forget. I'm sure they believe i've learned from my past mistakes." 

At his side was his wife Pat, dressed in a respectable Republican cloth coat with 
matching diamonds, and Nixon's new press secretary, David Frost. 

When asked about a possible running mate, Nixon replied, "Probably Jerry 
Ford. 1 owe him a favor. " 

T.D. 
Cresskill, N.J. t 

"To every action there is an equal and opposite reaction." If one considers the 5! 
sixties as the "Age of Action," the seventies are the 'Age of Reaction." * 

J.M.E. 
New York 

.... CITIMAC is just around the comer. In fact, during the latest remodeling job 
this month at my EasyBank, all tellers have been replaced by talking television 
screens. And how wonderful it is. They ask me how I am; what I would like; i*^ 
there's anything else they can do to be helpful — all in all, providing the most 
cheerful and efficient service this side of WEINER QUEEN. Frankly, I've devel- 
oped a rather meaningful relationship with one of the new computer tellers, perky 
and cute as a button, who practically sings to me and reminds me of the "Have It 
Your Way" lady on TV. ... 

Anonymous 



How about, "SLOPPY SECONDS OF THE SIXTIES"? 



D.A. 



Since childhood ve had a deathly fear of competition (or, more precisely, losing). 
So, I paid little attention to the contest. . but after you read the first week's 
worth of entries, my spirits rose. The entires were awful! With rare self-con- 
fidence, I said to myself, "I can do better than that, maybe." 

Unfortunately, another week slipped by before I got my letter to you, and one 
entry in particular put my attempts to shame. Basically, it expounded the doc- 
trine of "Dynamic Apathy" (to paraphrase, "You bug me so much, you almost 
make me want to do something about it"). Now, I'm not going to bother entering, 
and whats more, 1 don't even care about your ridiculous contest anymore. 

A child of the seventies 



The Twenties: 


Boom 




The Thirties: 


Gloom 




The Forties : 


Doom 




The Fifties; 


Zoom 




The Sixties; 


Whoom 




The Seventies; 


Blap 


W.S. 
New York 



Maybe more of us became more of what we are and learned to pay attention to 
the facts, beauty and variety of life— simple truths. 

R. 



THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING FREE 



RADIO 



March Folio 



V ^ 




I see the seventies as the Karen Quinlan decade — the era in which we all fell into a 
deep coma but for some obscure reason refused to die. May the eighties bring an 
end to this condition, one way or another. 

D.G. 
Brooklyn 

Whales continued to die prematurely. 

Marlon Brando was reborn. 

The FDA banned everything but lettuce and grapes. 

Burger King banned the FDA. 

Morris banned the Museum of Natural History. 

Boston banned Morris's autobiography, which contained a nude centerfold. 

The coup long awaited by WBAI finally occurred— at WBAI. 

On the west coast, witches announced plans for an anti-defamation league. . . . 

Howard Hughes died, flying over Texas, after denying the existence of Mae 
Brussell. (Have you ever seen them together?) 

Timothy Leary, flying over California, denied the existence of Bob Dylan. 

Jerry Rubin appeared with William Buckley. 

Cleaver, Colson and Carter found Christ. 

P. and I. found — and lost — each other. 

Sonny lost Cher. 

NBC lost Barbara. 

CBS lost Mary Richards. 

The Hershey bar lost another ounce. 

New York City's short mayor welcomed tall ships. 

And Neptune, New Jersey (my illustrious place of birth) boasted an Oscar win- 
ner. (Guess who.) 

P.M. 
Belmar, New Jersey 

The seventies are as a cup of the fifties and sixties, but with a twist of lemon, and 
a bit of honey. 

^a^ a ""'^ 



'(fce5)a|^» 



V 




page 13 



4:00 PRAXIS 

Live radio with Paul Mclsaac 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:15 SPECTRUM: CONVERSATIONS 
ABOUT AUDIO 

Manhattan audio distributors: what they 
know and don't know. Rodger Parsotjs 
rates them on a scale of one to ten. 

8 : 00 BERTHA BELLE BROWN : 
A LIFE-A RECORD 

Barbara Londin chats with Bertha Belle 
Brown about her quest for success in the 
music world, her "calling ", her odyssey 
from Texas. 

Bertha Belle Brown 



"tiJ^Yi 




9:30 BOOKMARK 

Books old, books new, books borrowed 

and books overdue, with Rick Harris. 

10:00 BIX AND BEYOND 
Jazz with Dick Sudhalter. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

AN INTERVIEW WITH PATTI SMITH 
Paiti Smith has published four books of 
poetry (Seventh Heaven, Witt, Kodak, and 
Babel and three record albums (Horses, 
Radio Ethiopia and Easter). Produced by 
Joann Jimenez, Lynne Edelson and Bill 
Kortum. 

2:00 SOUNDSCAPE 
Quasi-devotional music of Pakistan. Pro- 
duced by Vema Gillis, and prepared for 
broadcast by Edward Haber. 




3:00 AMERICAN PIE 

Live radio and rock music with Ira Leibin. 

7:00 ROOM 101 

Live radio with Steve Post. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
Presented by Jude Quintiere. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

HOUSING NOTEBOOK 

With Esther Rand of the Metropolitan 
Council on Housing. 

1:30 A TASTE OF THE BLUES 

Asked you to love me, you swore you 
didn't know how. When 1 showed you my 
money, you loved me like a farmer loved a 
Jersey cow. Presented by Clayton Riley. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

The Disabled in Action. 504, college, and 
disabled students. 

4:00 THE NEXT SWAN 

Live radio with Mickey Waldman. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:15 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:30 URBAN FREE DELIVERY 

A weekly radio magazine with interviews, 

news analysis and features, produced by 

Celeste Wesson and the Public Affairs 

Department. 

8:30 WOMEN IN SCIENCE 

An interview with Vera Kisakowsky, pro- 
fessor of physics at Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. Produced by Eileen Zatisk. 



rzm 



An interview with PatH Smith, cult figure, Wednesday, March 22 at midnight. 




o 



00 EVERYWOMANSPACE 
ileen Zalisk interviews Susie Orbach about 
er new book Fat is a Feminist Issue, deal- 
ng with obesity problems in women. 
Orbach believes that fat " . . is a social dis- 
ease, a response to the inequality of the 
sexes," and provides practical suggestions 
on how to control compulsive overeating. 



10:00 JAZZ SAMPLER 
Hank Jones. The pianist's work in various 
musical contexts, from the mid-forties to 
the present. Presented by Bill Farrar. 



12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE FAMILY ELECTRIC THEATRE 

TAKES A CHANCE ON THE 

COMMUNITY CHEST, BUT THERE'S 

NO PARKING BECAUSE SHE'S 

IN JAIL.. . 

Live radio with Nick Petron, Andy Bleiberg 

and Mike Teitelbaum. 



>/ 




5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF 

The Friday morning science fiction extrava- 
ganza, with Jim Freund. 

7:00 ROOM 101 

Live radio with Steve Post. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 

Presented by Mickey Waldman. 

12:00 URBAN FREE DELFVERY 

A public affairs magazine, rebroadcast 

from March 23. 

1:00 OPERA NOTEBOOK 

With Martin Sokol. 

1 :30 GRASS ROOTS OF MUSIC 
Kathy Kaplan and Frank Mare present the 
best of traditional and old-time bluegrass 
music. Produced by Don Wade. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

Community Action with Luana Robinson. 

4:00 THE NEXT SWAN 

Live radio with Mickey Waldman. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:15 WHAT'S UP? 

A program about astronomy and the knowrn 
universe, with Dr. Mark Chartrand, chair- 
man of the American Museum Hayden 
Planetarium. Produced by Mark Chartrand 
and Jim Freund. 

8:00 GAY RAP 

With Greg Gazis, Frank Richter and David 
Wynyard. 

10:00 SCRAPPLE FROM THE APPLE 

Jazz with Jamie Katz 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LISTENING WITH WATSON 

Live radio and classical music with Bill 
Watson. 




5 : 00 CLOSING THE GAP BETWEEN 
POSTAL RATES AND PHILOSOPHY 

We were at a crossroads, one rainy morn- 
ing in upstate New York. We all decided to 
set out in different directions to have ad- 
ventures. 1 said I was opting for a train 
wreck. So we all took off down the high- 
ways. I thought we should agree to meet 
here a year hence to relate what's happened 
to us during that time. But it was too late to 
tell everyone. Live radio with Jessica Raimi. 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

8:30 THE KID SHOW 

With Bill Greene and special guests. 

11:00 THE GOLDEN AGE OF RADIO 

Presenting— a surprise— gel that recorder 
warmed upl Produced by Paul Wunder. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LUNCHPAIL 

Live radio with Paul Gorman. 

2:00 THE PIPER IN THE 
MEADOW STRAYING 

Folk and folk-based music from the British 
Isles and North America, produced by Ed- 
ward Haber. 

3:00 WOMEN'S STUDIES 
Joan McNemey, poet. Dolores Brandon 
talks with Joan McNemey, author of Keep 
the Faith, Baby and Crossing the River 
Rubicon. She will read Crossing the River 
Rubicon in its entirety, as well as selections 
from her new unpublished work. Halluci- 
nations. 

4:00 EL RINCON CALIENTE 
Latin music with Carlos De Leon. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

With Abraham Aig. 

7:00 ALTERNATE CURRENTS 

Cutlure, consciousness, and the media. Ex- 
ecutive producer : DaveMetzger. 

8:00 GROW YOUR OWN 

Urban ecology with Liz Christy. 

9:00 FREE MUSIC STORE 

To be armounced. 



11 : 00 AN INTERVIEW WITH 
CHAYYM ZELDIS 

Bill Kortum talks with iconoclastic novelist 
Chayym Zeldis about his art, the problems 
of today's world, and Mr. Zeldis' activities 
with American ORT (Organization for 
Rehabilitation through Training) to right 
some of those problems. Zeldis is the au- 
thor of The Marriage Bed (G.P. Putnam) 
and Brothers (Random House). 

12:00 THE LATE NEWS 

With Abraham Aig. 

PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

IN THE DARK 

Night radio with Joe Frank. 



page 14 



March Folio 




5:00 SOUNDTRACK 



Live radio with Paul Wunder: rapping a- 
bout the cinema, film music, movie re- 
views, interviews, LIVE phone-in. 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

8:30 HERE OF A SUNDAY MORNING 
Early and baroque music, with Chris 
Whent. 

11:00 IN THE SPIRIT 

Spiritual discussiotis with Lex Hixon. 

1:00 THE VELVET SLEDGEHAMMER 
A women's magazine o( the air, featuring 
Hot Flashes from Majority Report, plus 
news, media notes, and reports from the 
entire range of women's activities. Pro- 
duced by the Women's Department. 

2:30 THE SUNDAY AFTERNOON 
GOSPEL PROGRAM 

A weekly survey of one of the richest and 
most sadly neglected of all the American 
musical traditions^presented by Leonard 
Lopate. 

4:00 WELCOME TO OUR WORLD 

Live radio with Ellis Haizlip. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

With Abraham Aig. 

7:00 THROUGH THE OPERA GLASS 
Verdi's I Due Fascari, presented by Martin 
Sokol. 

9:30 AUDIO EXPERIMENTAL THEATER 
Everything Exists Nothing Has Value by 

Joanne Akalides. Objective incidents and 
sayings from several Hindu saints. Per- 
formed by Joarme Akalaites, David Warlow 
and Juliet Glass. Directed by Joanne 
Akalaites and produced by Susan Howe. 
This program was made possible by a grant 
from the New York State Council on the 
Arts. 

10:00 AUDIO EXPERIMENTAL 

THEATER 

The Intestinal Skylark. 

A leg of lamb 
A loin of pork 

A human hand with five fingers 
A radio on the topmost kitchen shelf 
A drummer 
Hmmmmm. ..." 

Performance and interview with Steve and 
Gloria Tropp. Produced by Mike Sappol. 

PLEASE NOTE: This program contains 
frank language. If you feel you would be 
offended by such language, please tune 
away and rejoin us for 

12:00 THE LATE NEWS 

With Abraham Aig. 

PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

VERY VICIOUS TEENAGERS 

Bring your iron lung and a lifetime supply 
of rustoleum will be provided ... by Mike 
Sappol. 




5:00 LIVE RADIO 
With Beaumont Small. 

7:00 THE MONDAY MORNING SHOW 

Live radio with Clayton Riley. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 

Presented by Manya. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MORE THAN HALF THE WORLD 

Live radio with Judie Pasternak. 

2:00 STRICKLY ROOTS 
Reggae with Roger Trilling. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

A week of rebroadcasts from People's Law 
Update. Today, a look at legal clinics and 
advertising for legal aid. Coordinated by 
Bob Lef court. 

4:00 ADVENTURES IN JAZZ 

With Mickey Bass. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:15 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:30 THOR'S HAMMER: A WEEKLY 
REVIEW OF THE ARTS 

Mostly of poetry and fiction, this week 
presented by Harry Smith. Produced by 
Harry Smith and Joe Cuomo. 

8 : 00 CAN FT BE DONE : THE CITY 
PLAN FOR THE SOUTH BRONX 

Recently the city came up with a large- 
scale, long-range plan to renew most of the 
South Bronx. Tonight, we'll look at the 
plan, to see if it's another political pipe 
dream— or if it offers real possibilities. Pro- 
duced by Gregory Firaga. 

9 : 00 OUR CITY, OUR LIVES 
Neighborhoods. Women discuss the values, 
traditions and ethnic identity of New York's 
neighborhoods, and their memories of 
growing up in them. Second in a three-part 
series. Produced by Christine Noschese and 
Rosemarie Reed. 



10:00 THE BREAD GIVERS 

In which Mashah falls in love with 
Jacob Novak, a concert pianist, and 
son of a wealthy Grand Street mer- 
chant. With commentary by historian 
Alice Kessler Harris. Directed by Nina 
Mende, and produced by Beth Friend, 
Gail Pellett and Nina Mende. 



^ V 



March Folio 



11:00 HEARING MUSIC 

A program on music and sound — what 
they might be and how you can enjoy 
and use them. Tonight, loudness — or 
softness. Produced by Jim Theobald. 

A program on music and sound — what 
they might be and how you can enjoy and 
use them. Tonight, loudness— or softness. 
Produced by Jim Theobald. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

■ROUND MIDNIGHT 

Live radio with Leonard Lopate. Tonight, 
the notorious interview by Chris Albertson 
with Ruby Smith. Bessie Smith's niece. The 
raciest stuff you ever heard. 

NOTE: This program contains frank lan- 
guage, to say the least. If you feel you might 
be offended by such language, please tune 
away and rejoin us for: 




An interview with iconoclastic novelist Chayym Zeldis, Saturday, March 25 at 
11:00 P.IVI. 



5:00 SKYLITE ' » %< t^ 

Live radio with Linda Perry. 

7 : 00 THE TUESDAY MORNING SHOW 
Live radio with Clayton Riley. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
Presented by Gregory Reeve. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEW YORK AS YOU DONT KNOW IT 

The unknown wonders of Manhattan. 
Barbara Londin talks with Sidney Horen- 
stein. 

1:00 THOR'S HAMMER: A WEEKLY 
REVIEW OF THE ARTS 

Rebroadcast from March 27. 

1:30 THE LATIN MUSICIANS HOUR 
With Max Salazar. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

People's Law Update. A rebroadcast of 
Under Surveillance: Past and Present. Co- 
ordinated by Bob Lefcourl. 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 
With Pepsi Charles. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:15 ALTERNATIVE ARTS ACCESS 

A small press newsletter, with Joe Cuomo. 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marly Goldensohn. 

After the news: Hot Flashes, women's news 
from Majority Report. 

7:30 ILLUMINATIONS 
A program exploring the life, people and 
issues of New York City, as well as reports 
from our elected officials in Washington. 
Produced by Bill Lynch. 

8 : 30 EAST SIDE, WEST SIDE 

Annette Samuels brings her expertise from 

Community News Service to WBAI. 

9:00 THE REAL LFVE LESBIAN SHOW 
With Rebecca Tron and Carmen Garcia. 

10:00 WEATHERBIRD 
Jazz with Gary Giddins. 



12:00 PROGRAM ANNOlffJCEMENTS 

CASUAL LABOR 

Live radio with David Levine. 

5:00 EARTHWATCH 

Outer space begins at the epidermis. Live 

radio with Robert Knight. 

7:00 RADIO CFTY 

Live radio with Sara Fishko. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 

All it requires is an open mind. Presented 
by Jim Theobald. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 



REPORT FROM THE AAAS 

The American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science has just held its 
annual meeting. This program, the first 
in a series, will include tapes and inter- 
views on topics covered at the meet- 
ings: sociobiology, genes and gender, 
recombinant DNA, environmental 
health hazards, the frontiers of. science, 
new approaches to family life, and 
science policy issues. Produced by Bob 
and Eileen Zalisk. 



1:00 ELPUENTE 

Neighborhood organizing in Hispanic com- 
munities. Produced by Angel Aviles, Joe 
Cuomo and Marcos Miranda. 

1:30 OUTSIDE IN 

A rebroadcast of an interview conducted 
last summer with John Martyn, a musician 
who incorporates jazz, folk and blues ele- 
ments in his music. Produced by Edward 
Haber. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
People's Law Update : How to sue the bas- 
tards. Small claims courts and civil suits. 
Coordinated by Bob Lefcourt. 

4:00 PRAXIS 

Live radio with Paul Mclsaac. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

page 15 



A CHRONOLOGY OF 
PACIFICA FOUNDATION v. FCC 



October 30, 1973 

VVBAI, New York, broadcasts the George Carlin cut 
entitled "Filthy Words" at about 2:CX) p.m. during the 
regularly scheduled program Lunchpail which, on this 
date, included a discussion of contemporary society's 
attitudes toward language. 

November 28, 1973 

A New York man who, while driving with his young 
son on October 30, 1973, heard the WBAI broadcast, 
writes a letter to the FCC complaining about the use of 
such language on the air. 

December 10, 1973 

The FCC sends a letter of inquiry to WBAI asking for a 
description of the circumstances surrounding the broad- 
cast. 

January 8, 1974 

WBAI responds to the FCC letter of inquiry. 

February 21, 1975 

FCC releases a Declaratory Order concerning the broad- 
cast of "indecent" language. It ties the definition of "in- 
decent" language to words that describe, "in terms 
patently offensive as measured by contemporary com- 
munity standards for the broadcast medium, sexual or 
excretory activities and organs, at times of the day when 
there is a reasonable risk that children may be in the 
audience." [56 FCC2d 94, 98 (1975).] The broadcast of 
the Carlin monologue is found to be indecent under 
this standard, although no sanctions are imposed against 
WBAI. The Order is associated with WBAI's license file. 
The full text of the FCC's Order may be found at 56 
FCC2d94(1975). 

August, 1975 

WBAI files an appeal of the FCC's Declaratory Order 
with the Untied States Court of Appeals for the D.C. 
Circuit. 

December 10, 1975 

The FCC files its brief in opposition to WBAI's with the 
Court of Appeals. 

January, 1976 

WBAI files a reply to the FCC's brief. 

March 30, 1976 

The Court of Appeals hears oral argument in the case. 

March 16, 1977 

The Court of Appeals reverses the FCC's Order by a 2-1 

vote. The judge's opinions may be found at 556 F.2d 9 
(D.C. Cir. 1977). 

May 10, 1977 

The Court of Appeals denies the FCC's petition for 
rehearing. 

October, 1977 

The FCC petitions the Supreme Court for a writ of 
certiorari, requesting the Court to review the judgment 
of the Court of Appeals. 

December, 1977 

The FCC files a reply to WBAI's opposition. 

January, 1978 

The Supreme Court grants the FCC's petition for certi- 
orari, and thereby agrees to hear full arguments on the 
merits of the case. The FCC's brief is scheduled to be 
filed on February 23, 1978, and WBAI's is scheduled to 
be filed thirty days thereafter. No date for oral argument 
is set, although the Court indicates it may occur some- 
time in April, 1978. 



6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:15 SPECTRUM: CONVERSATIONS 
ABOUT AUDIO 

Antenna systems and radio reception — 
some new developments and a review of 
some old concepts. Hosted by Rodger 
Parsons. 

8:00 AUDRELORDE: INTERVIEW 
AND READING 

Audre Lorde's books of poetry include The 
First Cities, Cables to Rage, From a Land 
Where Other People Live, (nominated (or a 
National Book Award), Coal, and, most 
recently. Between Ourselves. Produced by 
Wesley Brown. 

9:30 POETRY: 
JIM HARRISON READING 
Harrison has written three novels: Wolf, A 
Good Day to Die (Simon and Schuster) ^md 
Farmer (Viking) ; and four books of poetry : 
Plainsong and Locations (Norton), Outlier 
and Letters to Yesinir (Simon and Schus- 
ter). He lives on a farm in northern Michi- 
gan. This program was made possible by a 
grant from the National Endowment for the 
Arts in Washington, D.C, a federal agency. 

PLEASE NOTE: This program contains 
frank language. If you feel you would be 
offended by such language, please tune 
away and rejoin us for 

10:00 BLX AND BEYOND 

Jazz with Dick Sudhalter. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LIVE FROM THE NUYORICAN 
POET'S CAFE 

Poetry, music, interviews, radio drama. 



T?i««jW 



JO 



V ^ 



3:00 AMERICAN PIE 

Live radio and rock music with Ira Liebin. 

7:00 ROOM 101 

Live radio with Steve Post. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
To be annoimced. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

WORK A COUPLE OF HOURS A DAY 

Daniel Singer interviews the authors of 
Work a Couple of Hours a Day, published 
last year in France. 

1:30 A TASTE OF THE BLUES 

A survey of rhythm and blues with Billy 
Vera, composer, musician and noted 
rhythm and blues record collector. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

People's Law Update : How to sue for large 
claims. Coordinated by Bob Lefcourt. 

4:00 THE NEXT SWAN 

Live radio with Mickey Waldman. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:15 COMMUNPTY BULLETIN BOARD 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 



7:15 THE CARLIN CASE 

The Supreme Court has agreed to hear 
the Federal Communications Commis- 
sions's case against WBAI— a case that 
could decide whether the government 
has the right to bar 'sensitive lan- 
guage" from the air. Last spring the 
U.S. Court of Appeals decided in 
WBAI's favor, stating that the FCC 
had improperly engaged in censorship. 



page 16 



Now this decision is in danger of being 
overturned. Paul Gorman and Joe 
Cuomo will present live and taped 
segments recounting the case, putting 
it in an historical perspective, and il- 
lustrating its possible ramifications. 
Produced by Paul Gorman and Joe 
Cuomo. 

10:00 JAZZ SAMPLER 
Don Redman. His early arrangmg and in- 
strumental career, with Fletcher Hender- 
son, McKinney's Cotton Pickers, and his 
own groups, large and small. Presented by 
Bill Farrar. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE FAMILY ELECTRIC THEATRE IS 
BROUGHT TO YOU TONIGHT BY 
SEVERAL UNSOLICITED GRANTS . . 

Lee, W.T., Bob and Ulysses— So we bit 
em. Live radio with Mike Teitelbaum, Nick 
Petron and Andy Bleiberg. 



f^^^^l 



5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF 

The Friday morning science fiction extrava- 
ganza, with Jim Freund. 

7:00 ROOM 101 

Live radio with Steve Post. 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS REBROADCAST 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 

To be announced. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

SALUD 

Take the money and run: national health 
programs. Martha Katz talks with Hila 
Richardson of Columbia University's 
School of Public Health about what to look 
for in national health programs. 

12:30 ECOLOGICAL FUTURES: 
ALTERNATIVES TO 
TECHNOLOGICAL MINDSET 

A talk by Philip Slater, author of Earth 
Walk and The Pursuit of Loneliness. This 
talk is one of a series of lectures given last 
fall at Ramapo College of New Jersey. 

1:00 TALL TALES AND 
SHORT STORIES 

A program for people who like to be read 
to. Produced by Ondina Fiore. 

1:30 GRASS ROOTS OF MUSIC 

Kathy Kaplan and Frank Mare present the 
best of traditional and old-time bluegrass 
music. Produced by Don Wade. 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

People's Law Update: Divorce laws. Co- 
ordinated by Bob Lefcourt. 

4:00 THE NEXT SWAN 

Live radio with Mickey Waldman. 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

RADIO SERIAL 

6:30 NEWS 

With Marty Goldensohn. 

7:15 WHAT'S UP? 

A program about astronomy and the known 
universe, with Dr. Mark Chartrand, chair- 
man of the American Museum Hayden 
Planetarium. Produced by Mark Chartrand 
and Jim Freund. 

8:00 GAY RAP 

With Greg Gazis, Frank Richter and David 

Wynyard. 

10:00 SCRAPPLE FROM THE APPLE 
Jazz with Jamie Katz. 

12:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LISTENING WITH WATSON 

Live radio and classical music with Bill 

Watson. , _ ,. 

March Folio 



/ 




Interested in dreams, biofeedback, hypnosis, nutrition, reflexology, Shiatsu, 
conga drumming or dance? Call WESTWINDS — 787-5605 — for our latest catalog 
of monthly courses. (Please mention BAI to our operator!) Or write: WESTWINDS 
at 38 West 89th St/No. 2, NYC 10024. 

RIDE BULLETIN BOARD 

Near as a phone to help you find shares for your trip. No fee to list with us, 
NO FEE TO VEHICLE OWNERS, if a rider finds a share we ask you to mail in 
$1/500 miles (honor system), examples: Boston $1, Chicago $2, Calif. $5. It's 
up to you to check out the people we put you in contact with. No obligation 
to try. 
7 Days 130 W 24 St. NYC 10011 (212) 989-0153 



HAVE YOU MOVED RECENTLY? 




MOVING? 

The WBAI Folio will not automatically follow you to your new home. To con- 
tinue receiving the Folio, please return this coupon with your new address, as 
well as your mailing label from this Folio, to; 

Subscriptions, WBAI, 359 E. 62 St., New York, N.Y. 10021 



^Umi. 



OiUu^ 



.^ 



Wouldn't you like to be even happier? Psychotherapy & relationship counseling 
needn't be painful! Crowing can be a pleasure! Miriam E. Berger, M.S.W., quali- 
fied therapist with 25 yrs. experience, now supervising therapists-in-training, 
Manhattan, Queens, LI. Fees $15-50. (212)657-3454. 

CARPENTRY— loft beds, bookcases. Call Marjorie DeFazio 866-4358. 

Eastern Regional Lesbian Conference, April 1-2, Hunter College, NYC (E. 69th St. 
btwn Park & Lex Aves.) Workshops on Community Organizing, Fundraising, 
Third World Lesbians, Disabled Lesbians, Feminist Media, Pre-registration - 
$5, registration - $7, more if you can, less if you can't. Housing and childcare 
avail., write in advance. For more info: Lesbian Feminist Liberation, 243 W. 20th 
St., NYC 10011, (212) 691-5460. Women only. 

WANTED DESPERATELY: tape of the last 45 minutes of Friday, September 23 
program "Street Music," with Bob Fass's guest appearance. Contact Lynn 
Samuels, WBAI, 359 East 62 St., 10021. 



FOR SALE: Beaulieu 4008-ZM-ll super-8 sound camera, Angenieux, 8 — 64 
variable speed power zoom, charger, sound barney, crystal synch, extras, 
mint condition. Call Alan 874-5679. 



FOR PEOPLE IN THE ARTS- PRIVATE OR CROUP THERAPY by a psychotherapist 
and spare-time writer who has worked successfully with musicians, actors, sing- 
ers, writers, painters, etc. Mature, nonsexist, nonracist, affordable fees. (212) 
595-1022 

RICHIE— Buttercups for the first day of spring. — Michelle. 



Have you ever wired a recording studio? 

Maybe you've worked for Telco. Is electron- 
ics assembly your specialty? Perhaps you've 
prepared cable harnesses for aircraft or 
computers. . . 

Then again, you may have a "First Phone" 
or an "E.E." 

In any case, your talents may be very useful 
to WBAI. If you can volunteer your services 
for menial but rewarding work with our en- 
gineering department, please call 826-0400 
and ask for Dave Marx. 



T-shirts say MOSCOW AGENT, LOVE A COMMIE TODAY or UNEMPLOYED 
100% cotton. Brown on tan $4.50 sent 1st class mail. Small thru Lg. MOURAD, 
Box 787, Bergenfield, New Jersey 07621. 

WANTED DESPERATELY: Copies of any James Irsay programs. Please contact 
J. Berta, 17 Orchard Drive, Wappingers Falls, NY 12590 



ADVERTISE IN THE FOLIO 



Display advertisii\g in the Folio is now being accepted. Our rates are available on 
request. Please contact Andrea Torrice or Bill Kortum at WBAI during business 
hours, at 826-0400. 



FREE COUNSELING based on the psychology of Jesus Christ "The truth shall 
make you free ' Also free food and lodging for those in need Call 762-8615. 



ARLENE— If you're so materialistic, I don't know what I ever saw in you. You 
know what you can do Mary. 



tAarch Folio 



Classified ads that do not suggest an exchange of money (personal messages, free 
pets, free counseling services, rides to share, etc.) will be printed free. 

All others (instruction, merchandise, legal and paralegal services, medical and 
paramedical services, recording and rehearsal studios, moving, carpentry, em- 
ployment, etc.) will be printed at a cost of $1.00 per line (about 10 words per line). 

Please send classified ads before the 10th of tfie preceding month to: Folio 
editor, WBAI, 359 East 62 Street, New York, N.Y. 10021. Make checks (where 
applicable) out to : WBAI Folio. 

page 17 



Maasm mmsb H'Vumha 

n New Subscription 
D Renewal D Gift Subscription 
For your address For your friend's address 





Name 



Address 



City 



Name 



Address 



City 



D 1 Year: $20 D 6 Months: $10 

D 2 Subscriptions a year: $30 
n My check (payable to Pacifica-WBAI) is inside 
D My credit card ($18 or more) will pay 



VISA 



^ 



Expiration date: 
MASTER CHARGE 



Expiration date: 



^ Telephone: 

^ Authorized signature: 



d n I will donate $ because Mike you C 

Friend of Free Radio Sustaining Member 

$1 20 a year D $10 a month D $60 a year D $5 a month 

MEsm mxnm \i >v'i'i^ii-^ 





ISSSSSlM 




Compliment 



Interviewers on llvingrgdiotry 
tomaKetheirguestsTeelas 
comfortable as possible. 



1 loved the gospel extravaganza! Thank 
you- Kaly Johnson 



More than 1/4 of 
the world 

Why is it that so much of the women's pro- 
gramming has a homosexual or bisexual 
bent? Let's have some more shows directed 
toward the great majority of women! 

R. Lehane 



Needing money in the 
worst way 

Marathons are the worst way to raise mon- 
ey, but I guess we can expect another one 
this spring from the self-destructive folks at 
WBAl. If you must, at least come up with 
some new angles. What's most boring is to 
hear some poor announcer trying to fill up 
a half hour pitching with one idea in his/her 
head. How about injecting a little humor 
into the pitches next time? But it doesn't 
matter, because I'll probably turn it off as I 
always do. Donald Aviles 

Eighty percent 



WBAl has been my main radio station 
for about ten years now, I stay home a lot 
so I listen to a lot of radio and have gotten 
an idea about how they operate. 



page 18 



Ever since the shutdown and your going 
back on the air, the station has become in- 
creasingly boring. It's always been boring 
at times, but now it's boring at least 80% of 
the time, especially in the live radio de- 
partment. 

You say your aim is to appeal to minority 
interests since other stations have a mass 
audience commercial appeal. The trouble is 
the minorities you appeal to are white 
bourgeois oriented intellectuals, I'm not 
making a racist remark but it's a fact that 
most of your staff is Jewish, and while they 
may think they're worldly wise, it's not 
very interesting to those of us of a different 
color and background. At least, not to the 
people I know. 

You have so many live radio people, each 
with their own philosophy, and while it 
may be heavy to them, it's to quote 
Nietzsche, "the confession of its originator 
and a species of involuntary and uncon- 
scious autobiography," Then they have all 
these phone callers with their philosophies. 
I don't want to hear their personal problems 
couched in seven syllable words. I've got 
my own problems. 

The best thing about these programs so 
far has been the music. While you lost such 
people as James Irsay and Julius Lester who 
knew how to talk and play music, you have 
Mike Sappol who knows his music but un- 
fortunately, talks too much. Even what lit- 
tle black programming you have is so 
solemn, it's like attending a funeral some- 
times. 

Give us programming representative of a 
greater cross section of people other than 
the Jews, or another solution, programs 
that are of interest to us "dumb majority, " 
but with gre.ater depth than the other sta- 
tions have. Either way, I think you'll bring 
in more money and have a lot better shows. 
Obie Hunt 

March Folio 




o 







I 





';-'> 




.^: 



2£^''; 



t 




:%^ 




n 



i 



'iK^< 







■■"«^ 



-'#/ 





/^^'A'; 



1*^ * 



\ 



r^::- 



WBAI 

Folio 



from the 

Pacifica Radio Archives 



This cover sheet created by Internet Archive for formatting.